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Johnson & Johnson buys Auris Medical Holding AG a Surgical Robotics Company

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No, that's not your doctor playing Red Dead Redemption 2 on his lunch break...he's using equipment from Auris Health, a surgical robotics company Johnson & Johnson (+0.22%) will 

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 for about $3.4 billion in cash.

The deal gives J&J (the 

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 health care products manufacturer) a leg up in diagnostic and early-intervention tools for lung cancer—an area where Auris has developed high-tech surgical scopes that can quickly identify cancerous tumors.

  • At this point, J&J can basically field a footbag net team of surgical robots. It already has a robot surgery company called Verb Surgical, which it formed with Google-owned Verily Life Sciences in 2015.

Zoom out: J&J’s deal shows there’s strong appetite among medical companies for developing tech to make surgery 1) less invasive and 2) much safer.

+ This is pretty funny: Auris Medical Holding AG, not to be confused with Auris Health, was...

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. Investors mistakenly bought its stock, which rose as much as 30% early in the day.

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