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Prison vs. Work

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IN PRISON...You spend the majority of your time in an 8x10 cell. 
AT WORK....You spend most of your time in a 6x8 cubicle. 

IN PRISON...You get three meals a day. 
AT WORK....You only get a break for 1 meal and you have to pay
for it. 

IN PRISON...You get time off for good behaviour. 
AT WORK....You get rewarded for good behaviour with more work. 

IN PRISON...A guard locks and unlocks all the doors for you. 
AT WORK....You must carry around a security card and unlock and
open all the doors yourself. 

IN PRISON...You can watch TV and play games. 
AT WORK....You get fired for watching TV and playing games. 

IN PRISON...You get your own toilet. 
AT WORK....You have to share. 

IN PRISON...They allow your family and friends to visit. 
AT WORK....You cannot even speak to your family and friends. 

IN PRISON...All expenses are paid by taxpayers with no work
required. 
AT WORK....You get to pay all the expenses to go to work and
then they deduct taxes from your salary to pay for prisoners. 

IN PRISON...You spend most of your life looking through bars
from the inside wanting to get out. 
AT WORK....You spend most of your time wanting to get out
and go inside bars. 

IN PRISON...There are wardens who are often sadistic. 
AT WORK....They are called supervisors.


When I finally left my last place of work, it was just like
being released from prison, as I was free to do whatever
I wanted to.

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    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      via TheWorldNewsOrg
      World News
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
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    • By ARchiv@L
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      Posted : 2017-01-10
      By Kim Se-jeong  
       
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Sabrina here and I'm going to share a few insights that will
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      Few things are inevitable in life: death, taxes.... and dealing
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      A few days ago, I was doing some much needed
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      many moons ago.

       

      I can't remember who taught it, but
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      Within these humorous insights are pearls of wisdom that can
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      I really wish I could give you the source, but no names were
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      The 24 Hour Rule
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      - natural consequences will take care of the problem
      - you can calm down and come up with a different
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      - the issue is no longer important


      The Elephant Rule
      Picture that a huge, fat elephant is coming your way. What
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      same is true when someone negative, angry or bitter is
      coming your way. Instead of getting in his way, just move
      and let him go by. Don't provoke or try to argue with him
      because he might stamp you.

      The Madhouse Rule 
      While walking, you see a sign on a building that says
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      from one of the windows saying: "HEY!! You man, are so
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      Do you really believe him? Do you take it personally? Do you
      let it bother your? Or do you ignore him and think: "Poor guy,
      he is locked in the madhouse and yet he thinks that I'm the
      crazy one."

      You might find it humorous or might even feel compassion,
      right?

      Well, you could have the same attitude towards other
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      The Hospital Rule
      Imagine a very sick person that is lying on a  hospital bed,
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      What do you do? Do you ask him to pass you the glass?
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      And that is exactly what you should do when you are with
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      A New Mode 
       
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Here's how to strike that "Goldilocks" balance between too much stress and too little.

      This may come as unpleasant news, but all stress isn’t bad. That doesn't mean that feeling overwhelmed and exhausted at work isn't a problem—it is. But some stress, in short bursts, can actually drive your performance on the job if you know how to use it.
      And that's a bit of a balancing act. You don't need to be told that too much stress can hurt your health and productivity. But many people don't quite grasp how to use a certain degree of work-related stress to help them. Here's a look at the different kinds of stress you're likely to experience and how to strike that delicate balance.
      PUTTING ACUTE STRESS TO WORK
      Research from the University of California–Berkeley hints at how some stress can actually be helpful. In the 2013 study, researchers subjected stem cells in the brains of rats to significant but brief periods of stress (in other words, "acute" stress), which caused them to generate new cells. Two weeks later, after these new cells had matured, the rats’ alertness, learning, and memory had improved.
      The researchers inferred that acute stress may help keep the brain alert, and that better alertness equals better performance. From an evolutionary standpoint, this makes sense: Stress is what helps animals adapt and survive, and that's no less true for modern humans. Inanother study, scientists at UC San Francisco analyzed this effect on a cellular level in humans. The results indicated that while chronic stress is damaging, small bouts of acute stress keep our brains resilient and can condition us to persevere under pressure.
      So what does this research mean for the workplace? Simply that stress isn’t inherently bad and that some of it can actually be good. It can push employees forward and help them perform at their best. Think about delivering a presentation, landing a big account, or meeting a tight deadline. During each of these stressful events—which are limited in length and can feel intense but not life-threatening—employees kick into high gear and push themselves to get results.
      WHERE CHRONIC STRESS TAKES OVER
      Just because some stress is good doesn’t mean it all is, though. We’ve heard over and over again that stress can have a negative impact on our health and well-being. And that’s exactly what chronic stress does.
      As the Mayo Clinic explains, when we feel stress, hormones including adrenaline and cortisol are released. Once the stressful event is over, our hormone levels go back to normal. But when we constantly feel stressed, our response system stays active, which means our hormones remain at unhealthy levels for extended periods of time. This type of chronic stress impacts every system of the body, including the respiratory, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems. That can lead to changes in appetite, loss of sleep, panic and asthma attacks, heart disease, weight gain, and more, according to the American Psychological Association.
      Unfortunately, many professionals experience chronic stress on an daily basis. And when it takes a toll on the employees' health, it can hurt the health of a business as a whole. A 2015 study published inManagement Science found that workplace stress causes additional expenditures of anywhere from $125 to $190 billion dollars a year.
      So if occasional stress helps employees grow, but too much stunts them, the challenge is finding the right balance. Here are a few ways to do that.
      SET TOUGH BUT ACHIEVABLE CHALLENGE
      When employees get comfortable with their regular tasks, it’s time to push them outside their comfort zones with new responsibilities. Those unfamiliar tasks can introduce the right amount of stress that pushes them to take on new challenges and learn new things.
      If you’re going to give employees new tasks, though, you first need to remove some of the older responsibilities they’ve already mastered. Otherwise they’ll feel overloaded, which can lead to chronic stress. Many professionals feel they have an unrealistic amount of work to do already, so if you aren't careful to keep your team members' workloads in check, assigning that "stretch" assignment can lead to burnout, not growth.
      ASSIGN ONE BIG TASK AT A TIME
      Give employees a large task, like delivering a presentation, leading a meeting, spearheading an initiative, or taking the lead on a major project. Whatever the project is, only assign one at a time. That way, employees are clear on what their priorities are and what they need to focus on.
      Unclear expectations can be a huge stressor. Focusing on one project at a time will help clear up what needs to get done and allow employees to set realistic goals to complete them. At the same time, each new project will introduce small amounts of stress to steadily improve employees' performance and skill sets.
      GIVE YOUR TEAM MEMBERS CONTROL
      Many professionals feel they don't have enough control over the timelines for completing their work, a feeling that chronic stress tends to exacerbate. And when their managers constantly change their priorities, team members are left scrambling to stay on track—and chronically stressed out.
      Instead, work with employees to set realistic goals and deadlines. That doesn't mean getting rid of deadlines altogether—timetables can still help apply small amounts of acute stress, which can be useful. But it's important to give your team members some say over what deadlines make sense. That will help control stress levels to ensure that the pressure remains productive, not overwhelming.
      Chronic stress is rampant among employees, and employers need to do their part to help create healthier work environments. At the same time, they should challenge employees to reach their potential. So banishing stress from the workplace probably isn't a feasible solution any more than a desirable one. The right balance is tough to strike, but it's achievable. In fact, that's a pretty good target for work itself—tough but achievable.

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    • Guest Nicole
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Radical hate preacher Anjem Choudary has renounced his Muslim faith after being forced to share a cell with a particularly persistent Jehovah’s Witness.
      Choudary’s cellmate, Dave Smith, is a devout Witness and has spent the entire week teaching Choudary about the ways of his one true faith.
      As one prison officer explained, “The Witnesses in here prey on the weak and feeble minded, but there’s very little we can do about it.
      “They get you in a locked room and make you think about all the things wrong with the world, and before you know it you’re reading The Watchtower finding answers on every page.
      “In the outside world you can close the door on them when they come knocking, and can easily go back to your evening, but when you’re in prison, there is no escape from them.
      “The British prison system is rife with radicalised Jehovah’s Witnesses going round refusing blood transfusions and criticising Christmas.
      “The people locked up in here are often disenfranchised and feel left behind by the ‘system’, so, of course they’re going to feel welcomed by a group offering eternity in paradise in return for ignoring Easter. Anjem really didn’t stand a chance.
      “Plus it didn’t hurt that the Witnesses also hate the gays.”

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    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Twisted Sutcliffe has been in Broadmoor since 1981 but has now been deemed "sane enough" to return to a normal prison.
      He was jailed for brutally killing 13 women and attacking seven others – some of the prostitutes – across Yorkshire and Greater Manchester.
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      His fixation with God inside jail has continued, as Daily Star Online recently revealed how hedepicts himself as Jesus Christ in a painting in his cell and how he has become a Jehovah's Witness.
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      Sutcliffe, 70, told hospital pals he would rather take his own life than leave his Broadmoor boudoir.
      He said: “If they send me back to prison, I’d have no reason to live,” the Sun reports.
      “I feel like I’ve lost all hope.
      “Category A prisons are a pit of black despair and hopelessness.
      “I’ll spend the rest of my days there.
      “Why should I carry on? There is a higher risk of attack in prison but the people in charge don’t give a damn.
      “It’s all violence, weapons and drugs. It will be so depressing.”
      It is thought Sutcliffe could be jailed alongside notorious British criminals, such as Soham murderer Ian Huntley and evil Levi Bellfield.
      When he moves to a regular jail, Sutcliffe will have to give up his luxury taxpayer-funded lifestyle – which allows him to watch telly, send letters to his sick legion of fans and enjoy multiple weekly visits.
      The move still has to be rubber-stamped by the Ministry of Justice and Sutcliffe is likely to face a tough time of it – having already been blinded in one of the three attacks while on the inside.
      Last week Daily Star Online exclusively shed light on the relationship between the Yorkshire Ripper and Jimmy Savile, as the pair used to get cosy over a cup of tea in vile Sutcliffe's cell.
      He attempted in 2010 to gain release which prompted outrage from MPs and the public.
      A decision at the Court of Appeal determined that he would never be released.

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    • By Kurt
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.  
       
       
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