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Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature. Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity. Unite humanity with a living new language. Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court. Avoid petty laws and useless officials. Balance personal rights with

Yeah... they are nothing to really celebrate are they? Wouldn't it be better to improve the current government? In this case they are leaving guidelines for a post-apocalyptic reader.....hmmm.....

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  1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
  2. Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity.
  3. Unite humanity with a living new language.
  4. Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason.
  5. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
  6. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
  7. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
  8. Balance personal rights with social duties.
  9. Prize truth — beauty — love — seeking harmony with the infinite.
  10. Be not a cancer on the Earth — Leave room for nature — Leave room for nature.

In other words:

1. Eliminate the vast majority of the earth's population. There are at least 7 billion people too many.

2. Use eugenics, but a little better than the way the Nazis did.

3. Open re-education centers to teach everyone a common language.

4. Replace excitement, religion and cultural traditions with things that a certain set of rulers accept as reasonable.

5. New World Order

6. New World Order

7. (OK. Revised Federalist Papers.)

8. Hmm. Don't allow personal (civil) rights unless they are earned.

9. A more secular definition of spirituality.

10. (OK. But not at the cost of 7 billion people.)

 

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