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Claudia Sanchez

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Everything posted by Claudia Sanchez

  1. Claudia Sanchez

    UN Compact 2018

    Could this be the same "Deep State" that is fighting Donald Trump right now? Globalists versus Nationalists..... Globalists are unhappy that Nationalists have messed with their plan. They want to take down the wall between countries and emerge as one large sovereign state while Trump wants to put up the wall.... thinking good walls make good neighbors. Interesting. Who will win?
  2. Amazon Amanda is a 280lb model who gets paid to crush men and make them feel small
  3. Claudia Sanchez

    The Apostle’s Creed

    I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, God's only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and buried; he descended into hell. On the third day he rose again; he ascended into heaven, he is seated at the right hand of God the Father, and he will come to judge both the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Christian Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.
  4. interesante.... fue programada así? Que tristeza por el si todos estos años vivio sin ella a causa de negar el parentesco por razones legales.
  5. Claudia Sanchez

    Robin Williams

    Robin Williams didn’t kill himself because of depression only. He was suffering from a type of dementia that was rotting his brain and he apparently knew it. Depression was a byproduct of that I suppose.
  6. Claudia Sanchez

    Sexy date night woman's outfit idea.

    LOVE the Gucci Belt.
  7. Claudia Sanchez

    Cute outfit

  8. Claudia Sanchez

    Antonio Guterres, a Catholic socialist soon at the UN head

    Interesting. Do we still have a seat in the General Assembly?
  9. Claudia Sanchez

    The Scandal of the Church

    In the second century, the Church faced its first great heresy: Gnosticism. This confusing and eclectic system of beliefs threatened to destroy the Church in its infancy. Among Gnosticism’s tenets was the conviction that the material world is contemptible, unworthy of redemption. Unlike the Christian view that the material world was originally created good but then fell through sin, Gnostics believed that the world we live in was created as the result of some tragic accident. Only the spiritual world mattered; anything physical was to be left behind. Against this heresy rose the great Church Father St. Irenaeus, who in The Scandal of the Incarnation explained that the key doctrine of Christianity is the Incarnation: the Word was made flesh and dwelt among us (John 1:14). The physical world is not to be held in contempt; on the contrary, it provides the means of our salvation. Although eventually Gnosticism was conquered, its material/spiritual dualism has reared its ugly head throughout Church history. Many heresies borrowed it, including Manichaeism, the heresy embraced for a time by St. Augustine. And although Protestantism does not fully endorse a material/spiritual dualism, there are aspects of this flawed worldview in its belief system—for example, in its rejection of a visible Church. In the most common Protestant view (since there are always competing views within Protestantism), the Church is an invisible entity made up of all Christian believers (how a “believer” is defined also varies among Protestants). Any visible manifestations, such as leaders or physical sacraments or buildings, are merely tools Christians use for practical reasons. None are essential to the Church, and all can be discarded if need be. In contrast, the Catholic faith teaches that there is a visible Church here on earth, founded by Christ himself. It includes a visible membership—the baptized—and a visible leadership structure: the hierarchy of bishops and the service of ordained priests and deacons. These visible aspects are fundamental to the Church and cannot be discarded. Throughout history, many Christians have been scandalized at the visible quality of the Church, usually because of the un-Christian behavior of its members. Scandals within the Church emphasize the scandal of the Church. There is a certain attractive neatness to the idea of a purely invisible Church. If a leader commits some egregious sin, then one can simply claim he wasn’t really part of the true, invisible Church (which contains only the pure and holy). Since the Church’s membership is invisible, this can never be disproven. We can even understand why this notion of an invisible Church gained so much traction in the sixteenth century; after all, this was a time of great moral crisis in the visible institution of the Catholic Church. Many priests were immoral and many bishops were corrupt, and some popes were both. How could these men be part of Christ’s Church? So the simple answer—they’re not—proliferated. Yet in spite of all the scandalous sins among its clergy and hierarchy, Catholics continued to insist that Christ founded a visible Church, and that we can know with certainty who are the members and who are the leaders. Why this insistence? Because visibility is essential to each of the four marks of the Church: one, holy, catholic, and apostolic. One: Visibility is perhaps most important to the oneness—the unity—of the Church. We see this clearly by the opposite example: the disunity of Protestantism, which teaches a purely invisible Church. If the universal Church is invisible, it doesn’t matter if you belong to the Presbyterians or Methodists or Lutherans. It also doesn’t matter, then, if your beliefs are unified. An emphasis on invisibility ultimately leads to tens of thousands of visible denominations teaching conflicting belief systems. Holy: Although the visible Church has always had sinners in its midst, it has also always possessed the means of holiness. And the primary means of holiness are the very visible sacraments. Through material things such as water, bread, wine, and oil, Christ dispenses his graces upon his followers. With the sacraments, we can know with certainty that holiness is attainable; without the sacraments, we can only guess. Catholic: To be catholic is to be universal. A purely invisible Church can claim universality, but only a visible Church can prove it. What we see in denominations claiming to be part of an invisible Church is constant breakups, with one faction claiming that another isn’t truly Christian. But in a visible Church, the Catholic Church, we can see with our own eyes the same faith practiced from America to Africa to Asia. Apostolic: Christ himself picked twelve men to lead his Church. He wanted them to be the visible leaders so that all men would know that communion with the apostles meant communion with him. The apostles understood how important a visible leadership was, and so they appointed successors—the bishops—to take up their mantle after their deaths. The hierarchy of the Church is a visible sign of the continuity of the Church—in teaching and in practice—from the time of the apostles to today. Even during a time of many scandals within the Church, there is nothing more scandalous than the Church itself. It reflects the reality that God has taken this broken material world—and its equally broken inhabitants—and uses it to bring us to him. It is a constant sign to the world that the material, physical world matters. We are each a body/soul composite, and so we need physical as well as spiritual signs to direct us to God. Just as God came into this world as a visible man, he gave us a visible Church to lead us into the next world. https://www.catholic.com/magazine/online-edition/the-scandal-of-the-church
  10. The Eucharist (/ˈjuːkərɪst/; also called Holy Communion or the Lord's Supper, among other names) is a Christian rite that is considered a sacrament in most churches, and as an ordinance in others. According to the New Testament, the rite was instituted by Jesus Christ during the Last Supper; giving his disciples bread and wine during the Passover meal, Jesus commanded his followers to "do this in memory of me" while referring to the bread as "my body" and the wine as "my blood".[1][2] Through the Eucharistic celebration Christians remember both Christ's sacrifice of himself on the cross and his commission of the apostles at the Last Supper.[3] The elements of the Eucharist, sacramental bread (leavened or unleavened) and sacramental wine (or by some grape juice), are consecrated on an altar (or a communion table) and consumed thereafter. Communicants, those who consume the elements, may speak of "receiving the Eucharist", as well as "celebrating the Eucharist".[4] Christians generally recognize a special presence of Christ in this rite, though they differ about exactly how, where, and when Christ is present.[4] While all agree that there is no perceptible change in the elements, Roman Catholics believe that their substances actually become the body and blood of Christ (transubstantiation). Lutherans believe the true body and blood of Christ are really present "in, with, and under" the forms of the bread and wine (sacramental union or, by some, consubstantiation). Reformed Christians believe in a real spiritual presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Others, such as the Plymouth Brethren, take the act to be only a symbolic reenactment of the Last Supper and a memorial. In spite of differences among Christians about various aspects of the Eucharist, there is, according to the Encyclopædia Britannica, "more of a consensus among Christians about the meaning of the Eucharist than would appear from the confessional debates over the sacramental presence, the effects of the Eucharist, and the proper auspices under which it may be celebrated."
  11. Claudia Sanchez

    The Bible Supports Oral Sex

    Song 2:3, "Like an apple tree among the trees of the forest, so is my beloved among the young men. In his shade I took great delight and sat down, and his fruit was sweet to my taste." Song 4:16, "Awake, O north wind, and come, wind of the south; make my garden breathe out fragrance. Let its spices be wafted abroad. May my beloved come into his garden and eat its choice fruits!" Notice in Song 2:3 that it says, "...and his fruit was sweet to my taste." Obviously this involves very intimate experience. Tasting one another can have a wide variety of applications. It appears that this is a veiled way of alluding to oral sex. Furthermore, if we look at Song 7:8 we read, "I said, I will climb the palm tree. I will take hold of its fruit stalks. Oh, may your breasts be like clusters of the vine." Apparently, fondling of the breasts is meant here. If such enjoyment of the body is intended, and since tasting (which involves the mouth) is part of that expression, it would seem safe to say that oral sex is permissible.
  12. Who are the most beautiful women in the world right now? Who do you think deserves the title of most beautiful woman of 2017? Here, below is a list of world’s most beautiful women. Beauty is the most debated topic in the world, and there is no ever clear winner. One who considered most beautiful at one time may lose her position at another time by someone else. Women normally have an attraction towards their physical characters like hotness and glamour. But, there are a few other factors like level of celebrity, confidence, intelligence, popularity, and skills too. It’s universal fact; beauty lies in the eyes of beholder. But when it comes to rank the beauty of a person, it is necessary to calculate the internal beauty as well as the external beauty. The external or physical beauty will age with time, all other factors remain ageless and keep person beautiful forever. Here, we have made a ranking of most beautiful women of 2017. The women listed here are confident, intelligent, desirable, dynamic and are very dedicated to their job. Vote for your favorite lady, and be sure to add anyone who’s missing from the list. A native of Florida, Abigail Leigh Spencer named People Magazine’s most beautiful women of 2017. She is an American actress known for her roles in several television series. Spencer began her career on the ABC daytime television soap opera All My Children playing Rebecca Tyree from 1999 to 2001. She is best known for her recurring roles on Mad Men and Suits. Also known for starring in the series Rectify and Timeless, for playing the leading role of history professor Lucy Preston.
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