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'Stashing' is the newest way to get screwed over in love

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Guest Nicole

Stashing, as the Metro reports, is that thing where you’re in a new relationship and everything seems great, except for one thing — you’ve never met any of your new love’s friends or family. 

You’ve let this person fully into your life, but they haven’t even so much as acknowledged your existence on social media or introduced you to one of their pals. Uh oh, you’ve been stashed. 

Basically you're being kept a secret for one reason or another, like a little treasure stashed away in an underwear drawer. Ugh. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/21/stashing-dating-slang/#UFb53n8wEaq6

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      Regardless of what’s happening in your love life, the way to propel it forward is to live your best life every day. Many people are waiting to live until they meet their partner. You don’t need a partner to live the life you want to have. Sitting at home, refusing to go out with friends and being allergic to doing those things that bring you joy are not helping you find love. If you’re doing those things you’re passionate about and enjoying life every day, you’re more likely to see love coming your way. Raise the vibrations in your life to what it is you want to experience. If you fill yourself with happiness, joy, friendship and companionship each day, even without a partner, you will draw more of that into your life.
      Be open to meeting people.
      You have to mentally be open to meeting people wherever you are. You also have to open your heart to meeting people. Are your mind and heart open to relationships or closed like a castle door? If you’re avoiding social events, staying away from group activities and refusing to engage with bigger groups of people, you’re preventing yourself from finding the person you’re looking for. Instead of hiding in your cubicle or in your tiny space in the world, take small steps to come out of your shell. Get comfortable being around a couple of people and build yourself up to being in bigger groups. You may not like to be in bigger crowds, but challenge yourself each time. Your best life (and your dream partner) are waiting for you outside of your comfort zone.
      https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/youre-afraid-love-will-never-show-dg/
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