Jump to content
The World News Media

Stephenson 2-18 has recently become the biggest star in the known Universe.


TheWorldNewsOrg
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Member

It's named after the astronomer Charles Stephenson:

Stephenson 2-18 is a member of the open cluster Stephenson 2, which occupies an area of 1.8’ of the sky but is not visible in amateur telescopes. The cluster cannot be detected in visible light at all because it is heavily obscured by dust, but it can be seen in infrared light.

It lies in the region of the sky between Alpha and Beta Scuti. The open cluster Stephenson 2 is one of the most massive open clusters in the Milky Way. It was first noticed by American astronomer Charles Bruce Stephenson, who reported the discovery in June 1990.

Stephenson 2-18 (St2-18, also known as Stephenson 2-18 and RSGC2-18) is a red supergiant (RSG) star. It is close to, and a possible member of, the open cluster Stephenson 2. It is about 6,000 parsecs (20,000 ly) away from Earth in the constellation of Scutum and is one of the largest known stars. It is also one of the most luminous of its type. It has a radius of 2,150 times that of the Sun, and has a volume 10 billion times that of the Sun. This star has a spectral type of M6, which is pretty unusual for a supergiant star and corresponds to its cool temperature of 3,200 Kelvin. But there is also a hypothetical Quasi-star... Quasi-star, also known as black hole star, is hypothetically star are believed to have only existed of beginning of the universe when most a the material in the galaxy was hydrogen and helium. A Quasi-star could be as large as 10 billion kilometers or roughly large than 7.000 times the radius of the sun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • Views 1k
  • Replies 1
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

It's named after the astronomer Charles Stephenson: Stephenson 2-18 is a member of the open cluster Stephenson 2, which occupies an area of 1.8’ of the sky but is not visible in amateur telescope

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share





×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.