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Boeing was recently hit with the WannaCry computer virus. The U.S. blamed North Korea for the...

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    • By admin
      They don’t miss screws or small parts at all. Especially not in very publicly facing areas of the plane. 
       

    • By admin
      Can you drop us off at the WeWork at 85 Broad Street in the Financial District?
      Thanks to Boeing's (+0.20%) up-and-coming autonomous air taxi, hopping into a drone/cab/helicopter hybrid to get to work might not be a fantasy...especially now that Boeing's prototype for its driverless aircraft completed its first test flight this week.
      Here's what yellow cabs' next existential threat could look like:

      Via Boeing
      Maybe not as frightening as an Uber...well, until you consider that Boeing's linked up with Uber to map out a plan for a potential "Uber Air" launch by 2023.
      The skies will be crowded with competitors
      Fellow aerospace incumbents (i.e. Airbus and Textron subsidiary Bell) and tech firms like Intel are all trying to revolutionize the way you commute in the future. Don't worry, we've configured the Brew to load in any atmospheric layer.
      But expect turbulence. Air taxis use complicated software that'll require plenty of sign-off from safety officials before it can be implemented in any meaningful way. Per the WSJ, getting that approval could take years.
      https://www.morningbrew.com/stories/ground-control-to-major-tom/
    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      via TheWorldNewsOrgWorld News
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      xperts are warning that there could be further ransomware cases this week after the global cyber-attack. So, what has happened and how can organisations and individuals protect themselves from such attacks?
      What is the scale of the attack?
      Ransomware - a malicious program that locks a computer's files until a ransom is paid - is not new but the size of this attack by the WannaCry malware is "unprecedented", according to EU police body Europol.
      It said on Sunday that there were believed to be more than 200,000 victims in 150 countries. However, that figure is likely to grow as people switch on their computers on Monday if their IT has not been updated and their security systems patched over the weekend.
      There are also many other strains of ransomware which cyber-security experts say they are seeing being given new leases of life.
      In the UK, the NHS was hit hard, but by Saturday morning the majority of the 48 affected health trusts in England had their machines back in operation. The NHS has not yet revealed what steps it took.
      The malware has not proved hugely profitable for its owners so far. The wallets set up to receive ransom payments - $300 (£230) in virtual currency Bitcoin was demanded for each infected machine - contained about $30,000 when seen by the BBC. This suggests that most victims have not paid up.
      Read more: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-39896393
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