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Nicole

Why Sitting May Be Bad for Your Brain

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Sitting for hours without moving can slow the flow of blood to our brains, according to a cautionary new study of office workers, a finding that could have implications for long-term brain health. But getting up and strolling for just two minutes every half-hour seems to stave off this decline in brain blood flow and may even increase it.

Delivering blood to our brains is one of those automatic internal processes that most of us seldom consider, although it is essential for life and cognition. Brain cells need the oxygen and nutrients that blood contains, and several large arteries constantly shuttle blood up to our skulls.

Because this flow is so necessary, the brain tightly regulates it, tracking a variety of physiological signals, including the levels of carbon dioxide in our blood, to keep the flow rate within a very narrow range.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/15/well/move/why-sitting-may-be-bad-for-your-brain.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Fhealth

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There is a saying to schoolchildren that they "need to warm up a chair" while learning, it means sitting and learning long. According to this study, the students (and we all) should sit for a shorter time :)))) ( but school hour is 45 minutes in Croatia) 

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"Past studies in people and animals indicate that slight, short-term drops in brain blood flow can temporarily cloud thinking and memory, while longer-term declines are linked to higher risks for some neurodegenerative diseases, including dementia."

uppsssss, some signs are already here

:))))

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      Credit: © pathdoc / Fotolia
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      Story Source:
      Materials provided by University College London. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
      Journal Reference:
      Neil Garrett, Stephanie C Lazzaro, Dan Ariely, Tali Sharot. The brain adapts to dishonesty. Nature Neuroscience, 2016; DOI: 10.1038/nn.4426
      Cite This Page:
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      University College London. "How lying takes our brains down a 'slippery slope': Telling small lies desensitizes our brains to the associated negative emotions and may encourage us to tell bigger lies in future." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 October 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/10/161024134012.htm>.
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      https://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-and-nutrition-information-27/obesity-health-news-505/obesity-might-speed-aging-in-the-brain-713775.html
    • By Nicole
      MRI scans found infants who drank more of it had more brain tissue, study found.
      TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Breast milk may help promote brain growth in premature infants, a new study found.
      "The brains of babies born before their due dates usually are not fully developed," explained senior investigator Dr. Cynthia Rogers, an assistant professor of child psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis.
      "But breast milk has been shown to be helpful in other areas of development, so we looked to see what effect it might have on the brain," Rogers said in a university news release.
      "With MRI scans, we found that babies fed more breast milk had larger brain volumes. This is important because several other studies have shown a correlation between brain volume and cognitive development," she said.
      The study included 77 infants born at least 10 weeks early, with the average being 14 weeks premature. Brain scans were conducted on the infants at about the time when they would have been born if delivered at full term.
      The scans revealed that infants whose daily diets included at least 50 percent breast milk had more brain tissue and cortical-surface area than those who received much less breast milk.
      The findings were to be presented Tuesday at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting, in Baltimore. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.
      Source: https://consumer.healthday.com/women-s-health-information-34/breast-feeding-news-82/preemies-brains-get-a-boost-from-breast-milk-study-shows-710484.html
    • By Nicole
      Scientists report that diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids can reverse the damage
      Date:
      April 22, 2016
      Source:
      University of California - Los Angeles
      Summary:
      Consuming fructose, a sugar that's common in the Western diet, alters hundreds of genes that may be linked to many diseases, life scientists report. However, they discovered good news as well: an important omega-3 fatty acid known as DHA seems to reverse the harmful changes produced by fructose.
       
      A range of diseases -- from diabetes to cardiovascular disease, and from Alzheimer's disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder -- are linked to changes to genes in the brain. A new study by UCLA life scientists has found that hundreds of those genes can be damaged by fructose, a sugar that's common in the Western diet, in a way that could lead to those diseases.
      However, the researchers discovered good news as well: An omega-3 fatty acid known as docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, seems to reverse the harmful changes produced by fructose.
      "DHA changes not just one or two genes; it seems to push the entire gene pattern back to normal, which is remarkable," said Xia Yang, a senior author of the study and a UCLA assistant professor of integrative biology and physiology. "And we can see why it has such a powerful effect."
      DHA occurs naturally in the membranes of our brain cells, but not in a large enough quantity to help fight diseases.
      "The brain and the body are deficient in the machinery to make DHA; it has to come through our diet," said Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, a UCLA professor of neurosurgery and of integrative biology and physiology, and co-senior author of the paper.
      DHA strengthens synapses in the brain and enhances learning and memory. It is abundant in wild salmon (but not in farmed salmon) and, to a lesser extent, in other fish and fish oil, as well as walnuts, flaxseed, and fruits and vegetables, said Gomez-Pinilla, who also is a member of UCLA's Brain Injury Research Center.
      Americans get most of their fructose in foods that are sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, an inexpensive liquid sweetener made from corn starch, and from sweetened drinks, syrups, honey and desserts. The Department of Agriculture estimates that Americans consumed an average of about 27 pounds of high-fructose corn syrup in 2014. Fructose is also found is in most baby food and in fruit, although the fiber in fruit substantially slows the body's absorption of the sugar -- and fruit contains other healthy components that protect the brain and body, Yang said.
      To test the effects of fructose and DHA, the researchers trained rats to escape from a maze, and then randomly divided the animals into three groups. For the next six weeks, one group of rats drank water with an amount of fructose that would be roughly equivalent to a person drinking a liter of soda per day. The second group was given fructose water and a diet rich in DHA. The third received water without fructose and no DHA.
      After the six weeks, the rats were put through the maze again. The animals that had been given only the fructose navigated the maze about half as fast than the rats that drank only water -- indicating that the fructose diet had impaired their memory. The rats that had been given fructose and DHA, however, showed very similar results to those that only drank water -- which strongly suggests that the DHA eliminated fructose's harmful effects.
      Other tests on the rats revealed more major differences: The rats receiving a high-fructose diet had much higher blood glucose, triglycerides and insulin levels than the other two groups. Those results are significant because in humans, elevated glucose, triglycerides and insulin are linked to obesity, diabetes and many other diseases.
      The research team sequenced more than 20,000 genes in the rats' brains, and identified more than 700 genes in the hypothalamus (the brain's major metabolic control center) and more than 200 genes in the hippocampus (which helps regulate learning and memory) that were altered by the fructose. The altered genes they identified, the vast majority of which are comparable to genes in humans, are among those that interact to regulate metabolism, cell communication and inflammation. Among the conditions that can be caused by alterations to those genes are Parkinson's disease, depression, bipolar disorder, and other brain diseases, said Yang, who also is a member of UCLA's Institute for Quantitative and Computational Biosciences.
      Of the 900 genes they identified, the researchers found that two in particular, called Bgn and Fmod, appear to be among the first genes in the brain that are affected by fructose. Once those genes are altered, they can set off a cascade effect that eventually alters hundreds of others, Yang said.
      That could mean that Bgn and Fmod would be potential targets for new drugs to treat diseases that are caused by altered genes in the brain, she added.
      The research also uncovered new details about the mechanism fructose uses to disrupt genes. The scientists found that fructose removes or adds a biochemical group to cytosine, one of the four nucleotides that make up DNA. (The others are adenine, thymine and guanine.) This type of modification plays a critical role in turning genes "on" or "off."
      The research is published online in EBioMedicine, a journal published jointly by Cell and The Lancet. It is the first genomics study of all the genes, pathways and gene networks affected by fructose consumption in the regions of the brain that control metabolism and brain function.
      Previous research led by Gomez-Pinilla found that fructose damages communication between brain cells and increases toxic molecules in the brain; and that a long-term high-fructose diet diminishes the brain's ability to learn and remember information.
      "Food is like a pharmaceutical compound that affects the brain," said Gomez-Pinilla. He recommends avoiding sugary soft drinks, cutting down on desserts and generally consuming less sugar and saturated fat.
      Although DHA appears to be quite beneficial, Yang said it is not a magic bullet for curing diseases. Additional research will be needed to determine the extent of its ability to reverse damage to human genes.
      The paper's lead author is Qingying Meng, a postdoctoral scholar in Yang's laboratory. Other co-authors are Zhe Ying, a staff research associate in Gomez-Pinilla's laboratory, and colleagues from UCLA, the National Institutes of Health and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York.
      Yang's research is supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant R01DK104363), as is Gomez-Pinilla's (R01DK104363 and R01NS050465).
      Story Source:
      The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of California - Los Angeles. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
      Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/04/160422091900.htm

      Americans get most of their fructose in foods that are sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, an inexpensive liquid sweetener made from corn starch, and from sweetened drinks, syrups, honey and desserts. The Department of Agriculture estimates that Americans consumed an average of about 27 pounds of high-fructose corn syrup in 2014.
      Credit: © AlenKadr / Fotolia
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    • Sigh .... the chemical industry also makes laundry bleach, and paint, and gasoline.   ...and a million other things.   You are supposed to be smart enough to not drink laundry bleach, and paint, and gasoline   .... and a million other things.      
    • Nightmares and insomnia often accompany posttraumatic stress disorder and increase suicide risk. A small study looking at whether the drug prazosin, best known for treating high blood pressure but also used to treat PTSD-related sleep problems, can reduce suicidal thoughts has yielded surprising results. They indicate it may actually worsen nightmares and insomnia and doesn't reduce suicidal thinking, investigators report in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology. "I think we have to view this as not the final word on this, but it raises questions," says Dr. W. Vaughn McCall, chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. McCall is currently seeking input from PTSD experts across the country but says a likely consensus could be that prazosin may help some, but may not be a good choice when suicide is an active concern. Two larger studies in active and retired military personnel yielded mixed results as well, the first in active duty military showed it helped with nightmares and sleep quality and a follow-up study just published this year on military veterans with chronic PTSD indicated it was no better than placebo. McCall's pilot study is the first in which all participants had suicidal thoughts or actions. "It did not seem to do much for suicidal ideation and that was somewhat disappointing, but the thing what was mind-blowing was that is actually worsened nightmares," says McCall. "Maybe it's not for everybody." He notes that with PTSD, a patient's nightmares often focus on the trauma that produced their disorder. Two study participants required emergency inpatient psychiatric care, but there were no suicide attempts or deaths over the study course. "We need to reconcile how is it that we had 10 years of data saying prazosin is good for nightmares in PTSD, a big study this February indicating it has essentially no affect and now a smaller study showing it can worsen some aspects," McCall says. "We need to know what it all means." The latest study led by McCall looked at a total of 20 seriously psychiatrically ill patients, two with wartime PTSD with the remainder mostly civilian females who experienced sexual assault. All had active suicidal thoughts, some had previous suicide attempts and most were taking antidepressants and/or had them prescribed as part of evaluation for the study. For eight weeks, they took bedtime doses of the short half-life prazosin with the idea of helping avoid nightmares and, by association, suicidal thoughts. They were assessed weekly for relevant factors such as severity of suicidal thoughts, nightmares, insomnia, depression and PTSD. One reason for the unexpected findings of the study could be the severity of participants' PTSD as indicated by the their suicidal thoughts, McCall says of his study. The once daily dose may also have been problematic in impacting suicidal thoughts, McCall notes. There was no significant impact on blood pressure, likely because of the drug's short half-life, and no suicide attempts or deaths. A result of PTSD can be too much noradrenaline, also known as norepinephrine, a stress hormone and neurotransmitter that is key to the body's fight or flight response. Its increase ideally is a short-term reaction that constricts blood vessels so we can adeptly respond to some threat. Prazosin readily enters the central nervous system where it blocks the action of norepinephrine. "What trauma does in part is put your brain on edge so you are always ready for the next bad thing," McCall says. "We use terms like hypervigilance, meaning you are always scanning the environment and PTSD patients often sit with their back to the wall so they can see the door. People who are over-diligent by day probably don't sleep well at night," he notes. The work of McCall and others has delineated a clear association between insomnia, nightmares and suicidal thoughts and behavior. McCall reconfirmed in 2013 in The Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine the link between insomnia and nightmares and how losing hope of ever getting another good night's sleep itself is a risk factor for suicide. Earlier studies looking at prazosin's ability to help when PTSD appears responsible include a 26-week trial in 271 military veterans with chronic PTSD who had frequent nightmares. The study published earlier this year in the Journal of the American Medical Association failed to show any benefit of prazosin over placebo in reducing the frequency and intensity of trauma-related nightmares. New or worsening suicidal thoughts occurred in about 8 percent of participants taking prazosin versus 15 percent taking placebo. The study, led by Dr. Murray A. Raskind, vice chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Washington and director of the VA Northwest Network Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center at the VA Puget Sound Health Care System, took place at 13 VA medical centers. Five years earlier, Raskind led another study of the drug in active duty soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with combat PTSD and nightmares. The drug, administered midmorning and at night for 15 weeks, showed it was actually effective compared with placebo in the 67 soldiers for combat nightmares, overall sleep quality, and generally reducing the impact of their PTSD. McCall's study used the same dosing schedule as the previous larger studies but with only the nighttime dose. Six participants completed the entire course of the trial, and investigators suspected that the weekly visits required for the study may have been arduous for some. Currently the antidepressants sertraline and paroxetine are the only PTSD drug therapies that have Food and Drug Administration approval and neither are widely effective, McCall says. https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-11-drug-ptsd-worsen-nightmares-suicidal.html
    • Beyond Meat, a startup that makes plant-based meat products, has filed for an IPO. The size of the offering? $100 million, but that number's just a placeholder. A quick appetizer of some financials: The company said that net revenue in the first nine months of 2018 came to $56.4 million, a 167% bump from the same period last year. Now, it's true that not every IPO filing gets top billing in the Brew—no hard feelings, Glucose Biosensor Systems (Greater China) Holdings. But this isn't just any IPO filing. It's got a buzzy product While Beyond Meat sells a variety of plant-based products from beef to pork to poultry, its bread-and-butter is the Beyond Burger, which is designed in a lab "to look, cook and taste like traditional ground beef." Why couldn't that have been our Chem 332 final project? Let's talk distribution. Retail: It's sold in large supermarket chains including Albertsons, Kroger, Wegmans, and Whole Foods. Restaurants: You can see the Beyond Burger on menus at Bareburger, TGI Fridays, and a few others. It's in a buzzy industry Consumers are increasingly shunning meat over concerns of environmental impact, health, and animal welfare. And the meat substitutes industry is poised to take advantage—it's estimated to grow to nearly $6.5 billion by 2023 (up from $4.6 billion this year). So it shouldn't surprise you that Beyond Meat is locked in a bruising battle with competitors. Not only is it duking it out with the like-minded Morningstar Farms and Impossible Foods, but there's also the traditional giants of Big Meat (the animal variety) to worry about. Finally, it's got high-profile backers Leonardo DiCaprio is a brand ambassador, and Beyond Meat counts Bill Gates as one of its investors. These celeb endorsements show how plant-based protein has worked its way to center stage. And there's no brighter spotlight than the one on the public markets.
    • The chemical industry perpetually uses devious tactics to con health-seeking people into poisoning themselves. The confusion existing around fats and oils is intentional, and it is designed to prevent us from making healthier choices.   The margarine scam of yesteryear presented margarine as a healthier alternative to butter. The medical establishment bought into the lie, and then it advantageously based an entirely new business segment upon eliminating cholesterol. Thus began another lucrative partnership between the food industry and the petrochemical industry, which are conveniently owned by the same people. One group profits from doing the damage, and the other division profits by treating the resultant diseases perpetually. The epidemic of heart disease began in the mid-twentieth century, after butter and traditional oils were replaced in our diets by the new “healthier” vegetable oils. Leading the health-destroying parade was researcher, Ancel Keys. He is known as the father of the Lipid Hypothesis. Keys cherry-picked statistics to create an international study of heart disease, and presented it to medical publications to prove that natural saturated fats cause heart disease. For Keys’ research, the term “international” meant using only the results from the 7 countries which yielded the conclusions that he wanted. He even titled his original paper, “The Seven Countries Study”. The data from the other dozen countries was stricken, because the data from everywhere else disproved the Lipid Hypothesis. Most of the data actually showed that there was no relationship between saturated fat and cholesterol, or even cholesterol and heart disease. At the time, many other research scientists were appalled by Keys’ shoddy research, but the media and its top clients in the petrochemical industry embraced Keys’ findings. Natural fats had to be replaced with chemically-altered fats and highly processed vegetable oils, of which the young biotechnology industry was in the process of streamlining. All of this very conveniently opened the door for industry giants to obtain monopoly patents concerning food preparation. The processes of obtaining naturally-occurring foods, such as butter, cannot be patented. Keys’ scientific swindle was so masterful that the medical establishment is still direly warning us about how dangerous butter is. In reality, butter contains a uniquely beneficial spread of nutrients and fats that are critical to heart, brain, dental, bone, and nervous system health. There is little wonder why the Bible foretold that the Christ would be raised on butter and honey, so that he would know the good. Most people now at least know of the dangers of hydrogenated oils, but these oils are still doctor recommended as the healthy alternative. Deceptive Marketing about Cooking Oils Soy oil is still being promoted at some retailers as the healthy choice (e.g. Whole Food’s Market), despite all of the revelations about it over the past decade. All soy sold is genetically engineered and highly processed. The word “soy” sometimes appears inside the fine print on the back of the so-called healthy vegetable oil containers, as if companies are finally beginning to hide it. Even though soy is now known to be an unhealthy oil by most health-conscious people, companies are much more willing to alter their marketing than their unethical practices. Some of the oil containers boldly list olive oil in huge text across the front of the bottles; implying that it is the main ingredient, but the labeling often reveals that olive oil is actually the last (least used) ingredient. The real and main ingredients are toxic combinations of highly processed soy and canola oil. A few of the braver companies still emphasize that their product is canola oil, since not everyone knows about canola oil yet. When the dangers of canola become more widely known, we can be certain that it will be the marketing (not the ingredients) that is changed. One toxic cooking oil product is even called Omega-3 Oil. This is despite the fact that it is virtually impossible to extract raw omega-3 oil without it immediately breaking down into something completely different, especially whenever heat (from processing) is added. The resultant non-omega compounds are hazardous. The Omega-3 Oil product is actually just canola oil — which, by the way, loses all of its omega-3 and becomes toxic when heated. Bear in mind that it is an oil intended for cooking. Pesticides are rarely used on soybean or canola plants, because both plants are so toxic that insects avoid them. Canola oil is officially an E.P.A. registered pesticide, and soy contains compounds that are designed specifically to disrupt hormones. What The Soy Industry Never Told You There is no such thing as an all-natural soy-based food, because soybeans are toxic in their natural state. Processing is essential for soy foods, because soy is poisonous in its natural organic state (containing natural insecticides), so there are never truly organic soy products for human consumption. When you see a product that is claimed to have “healthy all-natural soy”, then make a mental note to never buy anything from that unethical company. It has proven that it will happily hurt you, and lie about it for profit. Soy must be processed in some manner for it to be safe for human consumption, and even then, it is not truly safe. The fermentation processes that were historically used by Asian nations are no longer used today, and the overall health of modern-day Asians is rapidly declining. Soy is now made safe by chemical engineering in large-scale food processing factories. Putting all of the toxic impurities and alterations from the processing aside, the soy itself retains many of its original poisonous compounds which directly attack the thyroid, such as hormones that are designed to disrupt fertility. Women are especially prone to experiencing horrific hormonal disorders like endometriosis from soy intake. There is no way to accurately determine how many miscarriages and cases of infertility are the direct result of soy consumption. Soy’s Effects on Human Health 250% increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease Cognitive impairment Brain shrinkage and premature deterioration Produces steroidal hormones Produces estrogen-like compounds Vascular dementia Decreases brain calcium-binding proteins Early puberty in girls and retarded physical maturation in boys Unnatural menstrual patterns in women Malnutrition – soybeans have potent enzyme inhibitors Reduced protein digestion Interference with tyrosine kinase-dependent mechanisms required for optimal hippocampal function, structure and plasticity Inhibits tyrosine kinase which impairs memory formation Inhibits dopamine Movement difficulties characteristic of Parkinson’s disease Depressed thyroid function Infants who receive soy formula are 200% more likely to develop diabetes Birth defects Due to suppression of the thyroid, fluoride becomes much more toxic Inhibits zinc absorption Mayonnaise and Cold Pasteurization All commercial mayonnaise is cold pasteurized, because the raw eggs that are necessary for mayonnaise could not be left unrefrigerated for months on store shelves otherwise. Cold pasteurization is the process of saturating a food with radiation to sterilize it. Any “cold pasteurized” food is laced with cancer-inducing radiolytic compounds, in addition to benzene. It is very likely to still be radioactive at the time of sale. Radiolytic compounds and benzene formation are normal, expected occurrences whenever proteins are exposed to high levels of radiation. In addition to its radioactivity, commercial mayonnaise is made primarily of genetically-engineered soy oil, which is heavily chemically processed. Furthermore, mayonnaise typically contains hydrogenated oils and chemically-engineered additives. Since the toxins in mayonnaise are bound inside various fats, and since the human body protects itself by storing toxins inside fat cells, it is easy to deduce that a body will rapidly convert commercial mayonnaise to body fat. Why Vegetarians and Vegans Should Consume Hemp Instead of Soy Vegetarian and vegan diets leave individuals lacking in key nutrients, proteins, fats, and amino acids. Adults have a right to make such decisions for themselves, but parents who keep children on vegetarian diets are guilty of chronic child abuse. Vegetarian diets for children should be illegal, and this is doubly so for vegan diets. When people choose to be vegetarian or vegan, they generally utilize soy-based products to compensate for their protein deficiency. Soy is horrendous to a body, and it is unfit for human consumption. Infants who are fed soy formulas are far more likely to develop hormonal diseases like endometriosis and thyroid disease later in life. The estrogen-like compounds contained within soy hinder development by mimicking estrogen. They imbalance human hormones; especially in females. The ever-increasing use of soy in today’s processed foods is one of the reasons why young girls are starting puberty at younger ages than ever before. Hemp-based alternatives have become widely available. Hemp does not contain THC, the active narcotic found in its close cousin, cannabis (marijuana). Therefore, hemp products come with no legal liabilities for its possession. It is a miraculous plant that contains similar amounts of protein to soy products, but it comes without any of soy’s risks. Shelled hemp seeds are about 31% protein, in comparison to 35% for soybeans. Hemp protein is widely available in higher concentrations. It is produced naturally by simply sieving out the fiber. Hemp contains every important amino acid that science has been able to identify, and high amounts of omega-3, a substance that is lacking in almost every Western diet. Vegetarians should take heed that hemp contains even more omega-3 than walnuts, the most highly acclaimed vegetarian source for it. Vegetarians frequently have problems with stamina, which has been shown to be massively improved with hemp; especially when combined with iron. Hemp also helps those who are lacking fiber, and those who are embracing gluten-free diets. Readers should be aware that this report does not imply that any vegetarian diet could be considered ideal, but merely that the introduction of hemp as a complete soy replacement would be a very wise health choice. An occasional steak to provide bio-usable iron that a human body can actually use would be wise too. For useful iron, and the vastly superior form of vitamin A (retinol), there really is no good substitute for red meat. Whole Foods Market Promotes Soy Some years ago, we stumbled across a web page promoting the use of soybean-based foods at the web site of Whole Food’s Market. We knew that soy-based products were being sold at the company’s retail outlets for customers still embracing vegetarianism, but it was disturbing to witness the company openly promoting soy as a health food. Anyone taking a moment to search the Internet for information about soy will immediately see the countless reports about soy-induced infertility, miscarriages, premature puberty, obesity, hypothyroidism, endometriosis, and let us not forget cancer. Females can develop a permanent case of P.M.S. if soy is consumed regularly, or possibly something considerably worse. At least people consuming soy need not worry about pesticide residue, because soy plants kill off the insects. Virtually all soy is genetically modified too. Whole Food’s admitted that its promoted health food removes calcium, iron, and zinc from the body to cause multiple mineral deficiencies. They neglected to mention that it also reduces the absorption of magnesium, copper, and vitamin B-12, which are all crucial for cardiovascular health. Soy’s dangerous phytic acid may be reduced by the processing, but it is not gone. They furthermore neglected to mention that soy is no longer fermented with the traditional methods that were once used in Asia, and instead the company dishonestly implied that it still is. The new ‘fermentation’ is done chemically and with genetically engineered bacteria to ironically make the genetically modified soy less toxic. It is the type of food preparation that requires an environmental protection suit. Whole Food’s Market admits that one of its most promoted health products disrupts a body’s ability to absorb nutrition, which is the most common route to serious chronic diseases. It actually refers to the genetically engineered germs and yeasts in its soy products as “beneficial microoorganisms”. Practically everyone who has read about soy in the last 10 years knows that soy has been proven to be extremely harmful to health, so one might wonder where Whole Food’s Market got its information. According to their website, they found one source of information that was willing to publicly agree with them. It was an organization calling itself Stevens & Associates. Who or what is Stevens & Associates? This is a question for which no person seems to know the answer. Their website (now defunct) at soyworld.com was registered to Roger H. Stevens, who appears to be a one-man public relations firm that works as damage control for the soybean industry. He has the prestige of appointing himself to write the soy F.A.Q. Sources Sources Mutagens from heated.., Oxford Journals Dietary canola oil alters…, Journal of Nutrition Reduction of myocardial necrosis…, National Institutes of Health Physicochemical and functional…, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry Initial study of Hemp seeds …, National Institutes of Health Soy and the Brain, Western A. Price Foundation Soy by Roger H. Stevens, Faqs.org Healthwyze Source
    • CONJOINED twins Shivanath and Shivram Sahu have found a unusual way to get to school - dropping to the floor and running like a SPIDER. The 12-year-olds, who were born joined at the waist, bare two legs and four arms and work in tandem to get around. They have stunned doctors with their ability to wash, dress and feed themselves - and say they are determined never to be parted.
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