Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
TheWorldNewsOrg

Beef-eaters should be ‘hanged in public’ for consuming sacred cows - Hindu leader...

Topic Summary

Created

Last Reply

Replies

Views

TheWorldNewsOrg -
TheWorldNewsOrg -
1
226

Top Posters


Recommended Posts


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • Guest Nicole
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      “We need to direct our attention inward and connect to the breath,” yoga instructor Rachel Brathen writes in her New York Times best-selling bookabout the practice. “Focusing on our breath keeps us present, calms the mind, and allows us to develop the awareness of the body we need to practice with care and compassion.”
      Since the ancient discipline with roots in Hinduism and Buddhism became a popular exercise in the West, yogis have inundated popular culture with their pursuit of that elusive “calm” in a rapidly spinning world.
      “Mindfulness,” the meditative state associated with yoga, has likewise been adopted as a way to clear the mind.
      So when administrators at Bullard Elementary School in Kennesaw, Ga., implemented yoga and other mindfulness practices in the classroom to reduce students’ stress, they probably envisioned peace and relaxation in their future.
      Instead, they received a flurry of complaints — from parents who felt yoga represented the encroachment of non-Christian beliefs.
      According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Bullard’s principal, Patrice Moore, sent parents an email last week announcing changes to its yoga program.
      “I am truly sorry that the mindfulness/ de-stressing practices here at Bullard caused many misconceptions that in turn created a distraction in our school and community,” Moore wrote. “While we have been practicing de-stressing techniques in many classrooms for years, there have been some recent practices associated with mindfulness that are offensive to some.”
      Among the elements of the program that will be eliminated: the Sanskrit greeting “Namaste,” placing hands “to heart center” and coloring pages with the symbol of the Mandala (a spiritual symbol in Indian religions representing the cosmos).
      Moore noted that a rumor had also spread about using or teaching “about crystals having healing powers.”
      “We will ensure that nothing resembling this will be done in the future,” she said.
      Parents were concerned about yoga’s spiritual origins.
      “No prayer in schools. Some don’t even say the pledge of allegiance,” Cobb County mother Susan Jaramillo told NBC affiliate WXIA. “Yet they’re pushing ideology on our students. Some of those things are religious practices that we don’t want our children doing in our schools.”
      Christopher Smith, whose sons attend Bullard, shared a similar sentiment onFacebook.
      “Now we can’t pray in our schools or practice Christianity but they are allowing this Far East mystical religion with crystals and chants to be practiced under the guise of stress release meditation,” he wrote. “This is very scary.”
      Smith directed people to “google ‘mindfulness indoctrination.'”
      Cheryl Crawford, a yoga instructor who has taught at several Atlanta-area schools (although not Bullard), told the Journal-Constitution that yoga can help calm students who are anxious about their studies or coping with anger and bullying issues.
      The exercise is not intended to endorse any faith, she said.
      “It’s a way to get children aware of their breath patterns, their tendencies and habits,” Crawford told the Journal-Constitution. “Often times they’re focused outwardly, they’re not focused inwardly. It helps them if they’re very worried. … It’s a physical act, but you’re using your mind and your breath.”
      Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/03/24/ga-parents-offended-by-the-far-east-religion-of-yoga-get-namaste-banned-from-school/
    • By admin
      Swaminarayan Shrauta Lingayatism Shaivism Shaktism Tantrism Ananda Marga  
      Smartism Vaishnavism Gaudiya Vaishnavism ISKCON (Hare Krishna)  
      Hindu reform movements Arya Samaj Brahmo Samaj Ramakrishna Mission Satya Dharma Satsang of Thakur Anukulchandra Matua Mahasangha
       
      Hinduism in Indonesia Major schools and movements of Hindu philosophy
      Nyaya Purva mimamsa Samkhya Vaisheshika Vedanta(Uttara Mimamsa) Advaita Vedanta Integral Yoga Vishishtadvaita Dvaita Vedanta
       
      Yoga Ashtanga Yoga Bhakti Yoga Raja yoga Karma yoga Jnana yoga Kundalini yoga Hatha yoga Siddha Yoga Surat Shabd Yoga Tantric Yoga Sahaja Yoga  



  • Forum Statistics

    61,674
    Total Topics
    114,467
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    16,505
    Total Members
    1,592
    Most Online
    Leander H. McNelly
    Newest Member
    Leander H. McNelly
    Joined




  • Topics

  • Posts

    • The great thing about that, being Jesus, he  did not have to use a 2x4" timber upside the mule's head to get him to talk!
    • ...... some days you pick the strawberries ...... ...... some days the strawberries pick you ....
    • there really shouldn't be, especially if you read the whole sentence I wrote. Here, I'll save you the time from searching for it: I find jw's foolish because they follow the ideas of men, which changes to suit those in the power tower.  lol,   we......lol
    • In my “practical wisdom” mode, not my “world is going to hell in a handbasket” mode, I start my door-to-door presentation with an invitation to consider a practical verse like Matthew 6:25. “Anxiety is a huge concern today. We read about it. We experience it. I want to read you a scripture on that theme, you tell me what you think, and I am out of here. Good idea?” You can throw in a factoid or two from somewhere, like something here from the New York Times, but I usually pass. You are looking for people with whom the idea resonates, and if it doesn’t, the New York Times will not convince them that it should.  An affirmative answer to my offer will earn the householder the reading of Matthew 6:25. “On this account I [Jesus] say to you: Stop being anxious about your lives as to what you will eat or what you will drink, or about your bodies as to what you will wear. Does not life mean more than food and the body than clothing?” “That’s all I wanted to do,” I will say, “to get this notion on the table—that anxiety is something that you might hope to just “stop it.” He doesn’t say, don’t start being anxious. He assumes his listeners already are. He says ‘Stop it.’  The next move is the householder’s, and I tell him that he doesn’t have to make one. “If the subject piques interest, if you have views if you.....” and so forth. If he doesn’t (and even if he does), I will leave a tract—any of them will do—and call attention to the jw.org website and what is to be found there. If they do, then conversation might go a hundred different ways. Even so, I do not press every moment to stay. Rather, I offer every moment to leave. Even some lengthy conversations I have cut them sort, to the householder’s  protest. “Yes, you say it now,” I observe, “but after I go you will say, “Man! I wanted to get some stuff done today, and then this Bible guy showed up!” Maybe I have grown sensitive to all the concerns of those who cry over “manipulation,” and so I am determined to not even give the appearance of going there. Of course, the extremists among these ones are babies to whom introducing any idea not mainstream is “manipulation,”—they decry all “brainwashing” except for the brainwashing that is theirs—and there is not much one can do about that, but I try not to attract the charge like a magnet. I can hear Anthony Morris giving the talk now at the 2016 Regional Convention in Atlanta. I wasn’t there—I was at another convention—but the talk was streamed. “‘Stop it!’ Jesus says. Just ‘stop it!’ as though addressing a child—and that was the idea that he went on to develop, that it was a controllable emotion. It was a meaningful talk for me. Anxiety had proven to be a weakness for me —it afflicts some in the family—and when I was hit with a perfect storm of calamities, I did not blame humans like JTR does. I did worse and blamed God.  Believe me, I envy those brothers—I have met a lot of them—who say: “I’ve never worried a day in my life!” To be sure, that envy is tempered by the fact that some of these characters caused plenty of others to worry, and even when it was not so, they had other weaknesses to compensate or even more than compensate. We are all “pieces of work” in one way or another. I also know quite a few who, by choice, live very close to the wire. They have structured their lives that way. It is deliberate. They have determined to “make use of the world, but not use it to the full.” (1 Corinthians 7:31) They have decided to go light as to material things. The ideal among Jehovah’s Witnesses—which some have attained and some have not—is to acquire a skill that pays well, and then do as little of it as possible so as to have as large a share as possible in the kingdom proclamation work. I am not one of those people, either, but I sort of envy them, as the modern manifestation of Paul, who knew “how to be low on provisions and how to have an abundance. In everything and in all circumstances I have learned the secret of both how to be full and how to hunger, both how to have an abundance and how to do without.” - Philippians 4:12  These ones will crinkle a fender on their car and ask God what to do about it, since there’s no money in the budget for the mishap. What is God going to do about it? Time and again persons I know well have reported such things—they take it to God in prayer—and presently the answer presents itself in totally unanticipated ways, sometimes very unlikely ones. They thereafter attribute it to God’s spirit. Am I going to tell them that they are wrong? Why would I do that? How do I know? It is more likely—when you hear such things again and again—that they are right. I do what Mary did, with regard to different experiences: “Mary began to preserve all these sayings, drawing conclusions in her heart.” (Luke 2:19) Maybe they’ll do me some good someday, the same way they did her. Key is the confidence of 1 John 5:14: “And this is the confidence that we have toward him, that no matter what we ask according to his will, he hears us.” For it to work it must be “according to his will.” It seems that it will be very hard to dictate to someone else just how holy spirit is supposed to work. Almost by definition, you cannot. It is the wind of John 3:8 that you feel but cannot see. It is the angels that the cosmonauts did not see—and so concluded from that experience that there was no God. No, it operates as it operates and is one of those “taste and see” sort of things.  
    • Twyla, Thanks always for the biweekly spiritual food. Enjoy your day and week.
    • I think I didn’t miss a thing. You are either doing something unmentionable or you are making your escape—and not a moment too soon. Besides, I just made that line up myself. If it turns out that movie plagiarized it, they’ve got a major lawsuit on their hands.
  • Popular Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.