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Dog attacks 4 people, including church missionaries; one with serious injuries

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ARLINGTON – A dog attacked two Jehovah’s Witnesses missionaries sharing their faith on Tuesday in Arlington, while two more people were also injured trying to restrain the animal, officials said.

The attack happened at 12:26 p.m. when a four-member missionary team arrived in a truck unannounced at a home in the 6500 block of 204th Street NE near Arlington Cemetery, city spokeswoman Kristin Banfield said.

When police and fire personnel arrived, they found four people who suffered varying degrees of injuries. A 76-year-old woman seriously wounded in the attack was taken to Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, while her fellow missionary, a 40-year-old woman, was transported to Cascade Valley Hospital in Arlington for treatment of minor injuries.

A 63-year-old woman and 31-year-old man associated with the home were also taken to Cascade with minor injuries.

The two other missionaries were not hurt.

Witnesses reported that two people were attacked by the dog, then two other were injured trying to restrain the dog, Banfield said.

The dog, believed to be a pit bull breed, was released to Arlington police and requested by the dog’s owner to be euthanized.

Police are continuing to investigate the incident, and have not shared details on what prompted the attack.

https://www.marysvilleglobe.com/news/dog-attacks-4-people-including-church-missionaries-one-with-serious-injuries/

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I saw this article yesterday. Very sad. The individual attacked first had just gotten out of the automobile and was attacked at the car. The other three got out and attempted to help the first victim. Lesson to watch out. Life comes at you fast.

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