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Central Europe Bethel in Germany


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    • By Witness
      There is a revealing comment made on a recent organization’s video about trials JWs may face, that would test their faith and hope.  The speaker referred to these times as “storms”, using the account of Peter walking toward Jesus on the water, and how he temporarily lost faith before taking hold of Jesus’ hand. (Matt 14:22-33)   One example that he gave of someone’s ‘temporary, momentary weakness of faith’, was of a missionary couple who was sent home after many years in service.  This was referred to as “adjustments that affect our privileges in service”.  Apparently, this “privilege” to serve the organization in this capacity, came to an end. The person claimed to lose all sense of direction, and nothing in life seemed important. I can imagine how losing a “privilege” can be a demeaning experience. 
      We are aware that hundreds of people have been let go from Bethel at a moment’s notice.  Who was the source of this “storm” that these ousted ones now had to endure?  Who granted, and also removed, the “privilege” that people had thought was toward serving God? The speaker admitted that leaving the ‘comfort zone of full-time service’ can cause a storm.  It can produce fear in what is to come. It is interesting that even though the organization caused this upheaval, the speaker puts the burden on the victim, if they are at all affected by the storm and their ‘faith weakens’.  This really puts the organization on a “god” pedestal, whose decisions cannot be questioned, and who is never guilty for the suffering of others.  It aptly identifies the Beasts of Revelation that demand unwavering loyalty.  (Rev 13:1,2,11,12)
      In the event of a Bethel purge, some individuals have come to realize their entire service was to men, and not to God.  At this epiphany, they left the organization because of it. They recognized that no matter how much they gave and sacrificed of themselves, they were replaceable.  This really is no different than factory workers dismissed from their job without reason. 
      If we are faithful to God and Jesus, and obedient to His word, would we be replaceable?  Is this how God and Jesus express their love to us? (John 3:16; John 14:21; Luke 12:7; 2 Cor 9:8)
      Well, it seems obvious that there is no love in an organization that terminates people without a second thought, or the reason why.  (Matt 22:39; Rom 13:10; John 10:7-13; 1 John 4:9-11; 5:3)
      Can faith and hope flourish, without love?
      “But now faith, hope, love, abide these three; but the greatest of these is love.” 1 Cor 13:13
      If love is missing, can truth flourish?
      "Love does not rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth"  1 Cor 13:6
      Putting our faith in an earthly organization that is fully immersed in this world, is folly. (Prov 14:8; Isa 2:12,17,7,8) 
      Putting our faith in men and their lusts for power and riches, is pure blindness. (Prov 26:4; Isa 2:8,9,22;Luke 16:15; John 12:40; 2 Cor 4:3,4;11:13-15; Rom 1:25)
      The leadership centralizes their faith and hope in what they have built and desire to keep building.  Yes, they have a storyline to promote to their members and recruited new ones; but it is just that – a fabricated deceitful storyline, absent of God’s truth. (2 Thess 2:9-11) It promises salvation, a concept that is ‘bought’ with one’s full commitment to the organization and its leadership. (Luke 21:8; Rom 6:16; 1 Tim 4:1; 2 Pet 2:1-3; 2 Tim 4:3,4; Rev 16:13-16) (John 7:18; 2 Cor 11:3,4,20; Rom 6:16; Col 2:8; Rev 13:1,4,7-10,11,16,17)
      The speaker used the illustration of Peter grasping the hand of Jesus as depicting a restoration of his faith.  Jesus wants us to do the same today when we leave the drowning waters of Wormwood – the apostate “city”. (Rev 8:10,11; 13:11; 17:1,2; Luke 17:26-37; Rev 18:4)
      Turning back to the ‘beggarly things’ of the world, as in the case of the missionary rekindling his hope in the organization, will only cause terminal downfall. (Gal 4:9; Phil 3:19; Rev 13:4,8)
      Many who were associated with the "Watchtower" organization, have lost cherished things, due to being cast off as wicked by their local congregation. The spiritual path each one has chosen afterward, has varied. Which of those post-"Watchtower" paths, leads to eternal life?
      What follows, are excerpts from my reply to someone who asked such questions, after his rejection of the wicked steward's wormwood waters, and his exodus from the "City" of apostate Jerusalem. He wants to know how God views these decisions, and what reward he can expect for his discernment and decisive action to cease his association with God's rebellious and idolatrous nation.  Pearl Doxsey
      2 Cor 6:16-18; Eph 4:24,25; 5:11; Ps 26:4; Rev 18:4; Jer 51:6,9,45; Isa 48:20; Matt 24:14-16
      I encourage any who have left the organization, to read her reply:  
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
       
      Am I being too harsh to say that the organization is an unrelenting, bloodsucking iron beast?  Not in the least.  (Rev 9:1-3,7-11; 13:5-7)
       

    • By admin
      German Chancellor Angela Merkel wants the EU to own its data destiny by reducing its reliance on Silicon Valley cloud services, the FT reported.
    • By Money & Finance
      Negative interest rates = The bizarro market... And it's happening right now in most of Europe. The federal government of Germany just did something nearly unheard of: It issued a 30-year bond with a negative interest rate. Here's why that's weird:
      How a 30-yr bond normally works: An investor gives $900 today, in return for $1,000 in 30 years. Investors make money by lending. How Germany's 30-yr bonds work right now: Investors gave Germany $1,149 today, in return for just $1,000 in 30 years. Investors pay money to lend. The asparagus is white... and you have to pay to keep money in a bank. These are both truths about Germany right now, and it's thanks to the European Central Bank — Europe's equivalent to the Fed. It's using a negative interest rate to force you to take cash from your savings account and invest it instead. It's like opposite day for European bank accounts:
      In Germany, banks won't pay you interest — they charge you interest. Banks have to pay money for holding your money in an account, so they probably pass that charge on to you. THE TAKEAWAY  This is punishing you for not investing... European economies didn't recover from the financial crisis as well or fast as America's did. Policymakers there are still desperate to stimulate growth, which requires investment. So negative interest rates hurt people who don't invest. You're more likely to buy things or invest in stocks if the alternative is your money shrinking in a bank account.
    • By Witness
      A message from a former Bethelite.
       
       
    • By James Thomas Rook Jr.
      Is it fair?
       
       
      Is it FAIR.wmv




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