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Having A Weekend Lie-In Could Save Your Life

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Everyone likes a cheeky lie-in now and again on a weekend, but it comes with the annoying side-effect of guilt. Shouldn’t you be out doing more with your weekend?

Well, we’ve got good news. In a study published in the Journal of Sleep Research, Swedish researchers found that having a lie-in could actually lower your mortality rate, if you’d been missing out on sleep during the week.

Previous research has found that adults under the age of 65 who sleep less than five hours each night of the week had a higher risk of death. But this study suggested that catching up on sleep over the weekend could alleviate that risk.

"The results imply that short (weekday) sleep is not a risk factor for mortality if it is combined with a medium or long weekend sleep," the researchers, led by Torbjörn Åkerstedt from Stockholm University, wrote in their paper.

http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/having-a-weekend-liein-could-save-your-life/

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      Source: http://consumer.healthday.com/sleep-disorder-information-33/misc-sleep-problems-news-626/mom-was-right-a-good-night-s-sleep-helps-keeps-you-healthy-709848.html
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