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There are now 286 cases of possible and confirmed acute flaccid myelitis in the United States this...

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In January of 2017, my perfectly healthy 16 year old son went to bed. The next morning he woke up, felt something “weird” in his back and became paralyzed within 15 minutes. His only symptom-he had had a cold-a stuffy nose about a week before. Originally diagnosed as a stroke, then Guillian Barre, then ADEM, then TM during our 41 day hospital stay. A specialist in Dallas would change the diagnosis to Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM) about 2 months out. AFM is not Polio because it is not from the Poliovirus. But clinically, it is identical. Children fall like they are minuet dolls, their limbs suddenly (acutely) become Flaccid. Many are on ventilators as AFM often attacks the diaphragm. Some are paralyzed neck down. So far, it is rare. But the true counts in the US are unknown as it is not a Nationally Notifiable Disease. Some children get better. Others do not. Intense Physical Therapy is the only proven treatment. At the end of summer, 2020, it will return again. How many children will it take? How rare is it really when they are not sure of what virus is causing it so they don’t know what percentage become paralyzed? All we know for sure is that it is in the US. It is spreading. The number of cases continue to climb. And it is terrifying. #thisisAFM

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      Polio-like illness leaves kids struggling for years. Some never recover.
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