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Hawaii: Map of Homes Lost to Lava

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Total homes destroyed by new criteria: 235.

Improvements to map display and techniques used in assessing 'homes lost' have been made. Home status in this map now relies on the use of Hawaii County, Real Property Tax Department's publicly released information. The information from the County is used to locate, address, and account for homes lost. This allows for more accurate way to distinguish between a 'home' and a 'structure'. Each home now lists it's associated address. 

Addresses are determined to be 'lost' via on the ground reporting, aerial comparisons, USGS lava flow surveys, and disclosures by home owners. Homes that have been damaged by cracks, SO2, and even properties totally surrounded by lava were not counted. Also, since this change in methodology relies on tax records many un-permitted homes, and Ohana homes on the same parcel as a primary home, have been excluded. 

If there are in errors seen in locations of homes marked (not just the slightly off placement of dots) or something that is missed please post in the comments. My condolences to all homeowners who have lost their homes and displaced families. This is a hard time for everyone involved.

Mahalo to Jen Naylor Sexton for assisting in the map parcel examination and compiling a list of addresses. Heath Dalton for his accurate and robust information on status of specific homes. Ryan Finlay for his many, many contributions. And all residents that have contributed in this hard time by providing information about the homes and neighborhoods in which they lived. Also, a Mahalo to Kris Burmeister and Andrew Hara for their reporting back of addresses as homes are lost. 

 

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The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center released a new animation of the earthquakes near the #Kilauea summit. 

They logged 5,200 earthquakes since April 1st through yesterday.

The *largest one* was on May 4th when a 6-point-9 magnitude earthquake rattled the region. It triggered a small, localized tsunami.

The latest: https://buff.ly/2siR2mG

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