Money & Finance

Why Apple Invested $1 Billion in Didi

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Apple is deepening its ties in China with a $1 billion investment in ride-hailing company Didi. Bloomberg's Tim Higgins examines the deal and what it could mean for Apple in China.

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      The unlikely pair makes more sense than you think.
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