Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
Guest Nicole

Stephanie Booth: The larger-than-life character who was never far from the headlines

Topic Summary

Created

Last Reply

Replies

Views

Guest Nicole -
Guest Nicole -
1
872

Top Posters

  • Guest 1

Recommended Posts

Guest Nicole

pics-image-9-392125009.jpg

Stephanie Booth was once in the running to buy Wrexham AFC

Stephanie Booth, one of North Wales' most colourful characters, has died at the age of 70.

Also known as Stephanie Ann Lloyd, the businesswoman and hotelier was regularly in the spotlight during her amazing life and career, even featuring in her own BBC Wales show, Hotel Stephanie.

Originally born Keith Hull to parents who were Jehovah's Witnesses, she had to overcome transgender prejudice following her sex change from family man to female entrepreneur.

As a man, she worked as a director of a FTSE 100 company and became a father of three after marrying at the age of 21.

But, 16 years later in 1983, Ms Booth underwent gender reassignment surgery.

The flamboyant character told how she lost her job and family following the surgery, but was determined to forge ahead with her new identity and life.

Speaking about the gender reassignment, Ms Booth said: “Gender reassignment is a long, painful journey. It solves one painful problem in your life but creates others.”

In the mid 80s, she launched a transgender mail order catalogue and a contact magazine. A transgender hotel was set up in Manchester with a second shop in London.

Ms Booth married David Booth, and they moved from Manchester about 23 years ago to start one of the most respected business partnerships in North Wales.

They had a chain of seven hotels including Bodidris Hall in Llandegla, The Wynnstay Arms in Wrexham, and The Wild Pheasant , The Chainbridge and The Bryn Howel in Llangollen.

In 2008 and 2009, the BBC Wales fly-on-the wall documentary Hotel Stephanie hit the screens, giving a behind-the-scenes look at the larger-than-life character.

In 2011, Ms Booth was in the running to buy crisis-hit Wrexham AFC , but the club eventually came under the stewardship of the Wrexham Supporters Trust.

Later that year, Ms Booth's business went through troubled times when a chain of hotels run by her went into administration.

Ms Booth died at the age of 70 after a tractor crash at a farm on the outskirts of Corwen on Sunday night.

    Hello guest!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Jack Ryan
      A double-page article in the print edition of Wales On Sunday, a English-language Welsh newspaper, and 'sister' newspaper to The Western Mail (Mon to Sat). Wales on Sunday has a circulation of just under 10,000-copies each Sunday.

      Bearing Witness
      Wales On Sunday (UK), Sunday, August 5, 2018 - pages 14 & 15
    • By TheWorldNewsOrg
      via Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. World News
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Jehovah's Witnesses have been severely criticised by the Charity Commission for allowing a convicted sex offender to interrogate his victims.
      The commission's report said the women had endured "inappropriate and demeaning questioning".
      And Jonathan Rose had challenged them during a meeting with Church elders, after he was released from prison.
      A Jehovah's Witness statement said "appropriate restrictions" were imposed on anyone guilty of abuse.
      Rose was convicted in 2013 of the historical sexual abuse of two girls, aged five and 10, and sentenced to nine months in prison.
      Both he and the girls, at the time of the assaults, were members of the New Moston Kingdom Hall, in Manchester.
      At the time of his conviction, Rose was a senior member, or "elder", of the Jehovah's Witnesses.
      He appealed against a move to expel him, a process known as "disfellowshipping".
      In order to decide his fate, a group of elders had called the two women to a meeting at the Kingdom Hall, along with a third woman who had alleged in the 1990s that Rose had assaulted her, the report said.
      'Very intimidating'
      Over three hours in April 2014, the women were individually questioned by Rose and a room full of male elders.
      In an audio recording made by one of the women and passed to the BBC, Rose is heard saying to one woman: "Give me one reason why I would touch you?"
      He is heard challenging the woman, accusing her of making up the allegations and asking her to relive the assault.
      "What I am saying to you is this didn't happen," he says.
      "What was I supposed to have done to you that night?"
      One of the elders asks: "Did you ever egg him on?"
      "It was worse than the court case," another of the women told the BBC.
      "I felt everyone was on his side. I felt I was in the wrong. I felt very intimidated that it was all men, very, very intimidating. I was shocked he was able to talk to me.
      "He kept making out that I was lying. He kept saying why did I make it up, why would I say something like that, and at no point did I feel he was going to admit it.
      "I got to the point where I thought, 'He genuinely believes he's not done anything wrong.'"
      She added that another of the women had burst out of her meeting in tears, claiming Rose had asked if "she'd enjoyed it".
      In 2014, the Charity Commission, which regulates both the New Moston Kingdom Hall and the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Britain - the main UK Jehovah's Witness organisation, opened an investigation into how the trustees of the church had handled the case.
      The movement launched several legal actions to stop the inquiry, claiming the commission was acting beyond its remit.
      Eventually, the challenges were thrown out by the courts, and the report says: "The trustees of the charity... acting on legal advice, declined to engage with the commission following the opening of its inquiry."
      'Mismanagement'
      The report also found the charity's trustees had failed to tell the commission about the allegation against Rose from the 1990s, as they should have done.
      In a subsequent letter to the regulator, the trustees described the incident as merely "a matter between two teenagers", evidence, says the report, that they did not properly take account of the earlier incident when considering the new allegations.
      The report said they also failed to fully enforce the restrictions they had put on Rose's activities, allowing him to continue participating in the Church, and they "did not deal adequately" with the appeal meeting, allowing the questioning to take place, and therefore failing in their duties to protect people from harm.
      Taken together, the failures "constitute misconduct or mismanagement in the administration of the charity" by the trustees, the report said.
      "This has to be dealt with in a way that is sensitive to the victims who have gone through this terrible ordeal," said Michelle Russell, director of investigations at the Charity Commission. "In this case, they let the victims down."
      'No unsupervised contact'
      A statement from Watch Tower said: "Jehovah's Witnesses abhor child abuse in all of its forms and do not shield wrongdoers from the authorities or from the consequences of their actions. All allegations of abuse are thoroughly investigated and appropriate restrictions are imposed on any person who is guilty of child sexual abuse.
      "For years, Jehovah's Witnesses have had a robust child safeguarding policy. The trustees followed the policy by imposing restrictions on the perpetrator and by ensuring that he had no unsupervised contact with children during congregation meetings.
      "The trustees will continue to concentrate on doing all that they can to safeguard children and to care for the spiritual needs of the congregation."
      Jonathan Rose told the BBC he had no comment to make.
      The commission is now undertaking a wider inquiry into how Jehovah's Witnesses across the UK handle allegations of child sexual abuse.
      One particular concern is the Church's policy of dismissing an allegation if it fails its two-witness policy, which states two people need to have seen the abuse for the Church to proceed with a full investigation.
      There are also calls for the independent child abuse inquiry to examine the Church's policy.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      La policía ha evacuado el estadio Manchester Arena e investiga los hechos como un ataque terrorista

      La policía de Manchester ha confirmado que se han producido 19 víctimas mortales y más de 50 heridos durante una actuación de la artista estadounidense Ariana Grande en Manchester. Las fuerzas de seguridad han evacuado el estadio Manchester Arena al recibir información de dos fuertes detonaciones al final del concierto, al que asistían cerca de 20.000 personas. La policía está abordando la investigación desde la perspectiva de un acto terrorista y ha desplegado una unidad de artificieros en la zona.
       
      Leer más: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Tribunal rejects claim investigation into charity’s handling of sexual abuse allegations amounts to religious discrimination
      A Jehovah’s Witnesses congregation in Manchester has lost a legal attempt to block an investigation into its handling of sexual abuse allegations, after failing to convince a judge that the inquiry amounted to religious discrimination.
      Organisations linked to the religion have fought legally to prevent the Charity Commission from launching two inquiries into allegations that survivors of sexual abuse were being forced to face their attackers in so-called judicial committees. The organisation’s efforts have been described by the commission as unprecedented.
      The Charity Commission launched a statutory inquiry into the Manchester New Moston congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses in 2014, after reports surfaced that a convicted paedophile, Jonathan Rose, was brought face-to-face with survivors of his abuse in a judicial committee. 
      After Rose served nine months in prison for child sex offences, the New Moston congregation held a meeting attended by senior members, Rose and three of his victims – now adults – to see if he would be “disfellowshipped”, or expelled from of the congregation, the judgment notes. This would have involved “the elders of the charity (its trustees) and Mr Rose interviewing his victims, in an apparently intrusive way”. 
      This raised serious concerns at the Charity Commission, which oversees whether charity trustees are meeting their safeguarding responsibilities.
      The commission also launched a statutory inquiry into safeguarding the UK’s main Jehovah’s Witnesses charity, the Watch Tower Bible Tract Society of Great Britain (WTBTS), which oversees the UK’s 1,500 congregations and is believed to play a key role in deciding how claims of abuse are handled. 
      WTBTS launched litigation including an attempt to challenge in the supreme court the commission’s decision to start an investigation. The charity also fought in the lower courts against production orders that would oblige it to give the commission access to records showing how it handled the allegations, although in January it dropped its opposition to these requests.
      The Manchester New Moston congregation launched appeals at the first-tier tribunal challenging the Charity Commission’s decision to open a formal inquiry, arguing among other things that the investigation interfered with the congregation’s human rights, and that the decision to launch the inquiry amounted to religious discrimination. The charity alleged the commission had investigated safeguarding concerns at other charities without launching a full statutory inquiry.
      When the first appeal was dismissed, the congregation appealed to the upper tribunal. This was rejected on Tuesday at the upper tribunal of the tax and chancery division at the Royal Courts of Justice in London.
      Mrs Justice Asplin ruled the lower tribunal had been “entitled to decide that there was no direct discrimination on the grounds of religion, the inquiry having been opened on the basis of unusual and distinctive factual reasons ... and that there were no other comparable cases from which to infer discrimination on the grounds of religious beliefs.”
      The Charity Commission’s head of litigation, Chris Willis Pickup, said: “We regret that public and charity funds have been used on this protracted litigation, but we will continue to defend robustly our legitimate role in investigating serious concerns about charities.
      “We hope and expect that this judgment concludes the litigation on this matter and allows us, and the charity, to focus our efforts on concluding the Commission’s inquiry.”

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Jack Ryan
      see link below:
        Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By The Librarian
      Dog owners have been given leaflets telling them to keep their pets off the streets for religious reasons. The handouts were published by a movement called ‘for public purity’, it claims the area has a large Muslim population who would be upset with seeing dogs on the streets.
       
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Women over 40 are having more babies than the under 20s for the first time in nearly 70 years, official figures for England and Wales show.
      The Office for National Statistics data showed there were 697,852 live births in 2015.
      There were 15.2 births per 1,000 women aged over 40, compared with just 14.5 per 1,000 women in their teens.
      The last time the over 40s had the higher fertility rate was in 1947, in the wake of WWII.
      The figures show two key trends in who is having children and when in England and Wales.
      The teenage pregnancy rate has been in long-term decline and has more than halved from the 33 births per 1,000 teenagers in 1990.
      Meanwhile, pregnancies have soared in older age groups from 5.3 per 1,000 in 1990.
      The average age of having a child is now 30.3 - a figure that has been increasing since 1975.
      Advances in fertility treatment as well as more women in higher education and attitudes around the importance of a career and the rising costs of childbearing are behind the rise, the ONS says.
      Liz McLaren, head of vital statistics outputs at the ONS, said: "The trend for women to have babies at older ages continued in 2015.
      "Over the last 40 years, the percentage of live births to women aged 35 and over has increased considerably.
      "Women aged 40 and over now have a higher fertility rate than women aged under 20 - this was last recorded in the 1940s."
      The data also shows that fertility rates have dropped in all age groups under 25 while increasing for all age groups 30 and over.
      Women aged between 30 and 34 have the highest fertility of any age group - with 111 births per 1,000 women.
      The number of births to women born outside the UK has also continued its rise, reaching 27.5% of all births.
      Prof Adam Balen, the chairman of the British Fertility Society, said: "We know that female fertility starts to decline gradually from the late 20s and more rapidly from the mid-30s onwards.
      "While the risks should never be overplayed, men and women should be aware that reproductive outcomes are poorer in older women.
      "As well as it potentially taking longer to get pregnant, later maternity can involve a greater risk of miscarriage, a more complicated labour, and medical intervention at the birth."
      The British Pregnancy Advisory Service said: "The trend towards older motherhood is here to stay, and there are many understandable reasons why women today are waiting longer to start or expand their families than those in previous decades.
      "Rather than bemoaning this development, we should seek to understand and support the decisions women make.
      "More affordable childcare and improved maternity rights may make it easier for some women to start their families earlier if they wish, but we also need to ensure we have high quality reproductive healthcare services configured to meet women's needs, whatever the age at which they conceive."

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      While Americans continue to fume over President Barack Obama’s directive last week that schoolchildren must be allowed to choose the bathroom that aligns with their gender identity, and not their birth certificate, Canadians are bracing for a related fight.
      While receiving an award for his commitment to fighting transphobia and homophobia, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced that his administration would introduce new legislation Tuesday morning to protect the rights of transgender citizens.
      “I am proud to announce that tomorrow, on the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia, we will be tabling a bill in the House of Commons to ensure the full protection of transgender people,” Trudeau said on Monday in Montreal at an event hosted by Foundation Emergence, a gay rights group. “We must continue to demand true equality.”
      Trudeau also announced that he would be attending the Montreal pride festival this summer, the first prime minister to do so.
      The prime minister didn’t offer specific details in the announcement, but CBC News reported that he asked Justice Minister Jody Wilson Raybould “to add gender identity as a prohibited ground for discrimination under the Canadian Human Rights Act, and to the list of distinguishing characteristics of ‘identifiable group’ protected by the hate speech provisions of the Criminal Code.”
      U.S. civil rights laws, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 make mention only of color, race, religion, national origin and sex. Advocates have repeated and unsuccessfully attempted for years to add “sexual orientation” or “gender identity” to Title VII through an “Employment Non-Discrimination Act” (ENDA).
      In the absence of such explicit wording, however, a number of lower federal courts, the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission and the Obama administration have interpreted the law to cover such discrimination. On that basis, the administration justified its letter last week to the states insisting that bathrooms and locker rooms be open to individuals on the basis of their gender identity rather than their gender assigned at birth. It remains vulnerable to court challenge in part because of the law’s silence on the subject.
      The call to action from Trudeau is no surprise — he campaigned on the action before he was elected last year. And it’s not the first time Canadians have pushed for an amendment to their laws to include gender identity protections; proposals to do so have already passed the House of Commons twice, CBC News reported. In 2010, one bill never matured because Parliament was dissolved for an election soon after it passed the House, according to CBC News. Then in 2013, another proposal passed the House but stalled in the Senate.
      Similar to the U.S., the reason is bathrooms. Opponents in both countries have argued that extending protections could make it easier for sexual predators to target children in public bathrooms.
      This attempt may be different, in part because of Trudeau’s backing. His administration holds a majority in the House of Commons, the Guardian reported, making passage likely. Support in the senate, though, is still unclear.
      During his announcement, Trudeau made it clear he hoped Canada would rise as a leader on the issue.
      “I sincerely believe that in Canada we can and must do more,” he said. “Not just here, for us, but to show the rest of the world that an open and free society is the greatest thing we can aspire to together.”
      Since North Carolina lawmakers passed a law requiring people to use the bathroom that aligns with the gender on their birth certificate, an already simmering debate about transgender rights in America has boiled over, provoking multiple lawsuits between gay rights advocates, the Tar Heel state, the federal government and advocacy groups.
      Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/05/17/canadian-prime-minister-justin-trudeau-announces-new-transgender-rights-bill/
    • By admin
      A former church elder in South Wales has claimed the church has gone against the request made by Judge Lowell Goddard

      The Jehovah’s Witnesses have been accused of ordering the destruction of documents in direct contradiction of an order not to do so from a major child sexual abuse inquiry.
      Religious organisations, as well as schools, colleges and other institutions, have been told by the 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.  – led by Judge Lowell Goddard – to keep hold of any documents which could be useful to the investigation. A request sent out to the bodies last year stated measures should be taken “to ensure that everything of potential relevance to the Inquiry is retained”.
      Jehovah’s Witness elders hear allegations against members of the congregation and record what is said.
      We have seen a copy of an edict distributed to Jehovah’s Witnesses congregations around the UK ordering the destruction of “all agendas and minutes of elders’ meetings (other than business meeting minutes)”, “all personal notes taken at elders’ meetings (except those based on discussions of outlines from ‘the faithful and discreet slave’ and that do not mention any particular individual)” and “any other personal records, notes, or correspondence that refer to particular individuals”.
      'Not transparent'
      Referring to the congregation file the edict also says all agendas of elders’ meetings should be destroyed and that Congregation Service Committees should “make sure all records relating to child molestation are in harmony”.
      And one former senior church elder from South Wales, who has been a Jehovah’s Witness for more than half a century, said the revelations put the church directly at odds with the request of the independent inquiry.
      He said: “The fact is there are dangers within the Jehovah’s Witnesses as there are within other organisations – but whereas I see other organisations taking steps to conform with child safety it seems the Jehovah’s Witnesses are going the other way. They are still trying to keep it in-house and not making it transparent.”
      He added: “Under the present rules all personal documents, aides-memoire, agendas and notes are to be destroyed. That will mean in future that if they are approached by police Jehovah’s Witnesses could say they don’t remember anything.
       
      New Zealand High Court judge Justice Lowell Goddard  
      “This seems a backward step, particularly in the light of Judge Lowell Goddard’s request that, so victims can be helped in bringing justice to abusers, all organisations must keep what they can to assist.
      'Ignored' judge's request
      “Why, when an organisation says it abhors child abuse, would it go and destroy documents that can assist in bringing a child abuser to justice?
      “The evidence I have experienced is a clamming up, a shutting down, and a silence of almost an obstructive nature to police investigations.
      “They are saying they send this out regularly but Judge Lowell Goddard has said not to – so why haven’t they instructed the elders and said that although they usually do this but this year we won’t because we want to follow this request?
      “They say it’s what they have always done but we have got to change what we have always done.”
      Karen Morgan, a victim of sex abuse by church elder Mark Sewell, who was once an elder in the congregation in 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. ,  Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. , also criticised the move. She said: “At the time of my case the police were told there was no paperwork relating to my case as it had been destroyed. This paperwork would have contained all documented evidence from the many meetings with elders.
      “Despite knowing the importance of these papers the governing body seem to be deliberately instructing their elders not to keep them.
      Church 'committed' to helping victims
      “This only confirms my view that the governing body are more interested in protecting their image than caring about the victims.”
      A spokesman for the church said: “We are committed to doing all we can to prevent child abuse and to provide spiritual comfort to any who have suffered from this terrible sin and crime.”
      Speaking about the leaked edict the spokesman added: “The document... is simply an annual reminder sent to congregation trustees encouraging them to follow standard procedures so as to meet their responsibilities under data protection and other legislation.”
      The spokesman also said: “Jehovah’s Witnesses abhor child abuse and view it as a heinous crime and sin. The safety of our children is of the utmost importance.
      “For decades our journals The Watchtower and Awake!, as well as our website jw.org, have featured articles for both Jehovah’s Witnesses and the general public on how to protect children from abuse.
      Cover-up claim 'absolutely false'
      “We have no paid clergy. Congregation elders comply with child-abuse reporting laws and with the data protection principles contained in the Data Protection Act 1998. (Romans 13:1) They provide abuse victims and their families with spiritual comfort from the Bible. (Isaiah 32:2; 1 Thessalonians 5:14)
      “The victim and his or her parents have the absolute right to report the matter to the governmental authorities. (Galatians 6:5) Congregation elders do not shield abusers from the authorities or from the consequences of their actions. (Galatians 6:7)
      “Anyone who commits the sin of child abuse faces expulsion from the congregation. If such a person is serving in a position of responsibility he is removed. Any suggestion that Jehovah’s Witnesses cover up child abuse is absolutely false."
      A spokesperson for the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse said: “The chair has stated that the inquiry will investigate abuse in religious settings (including all faiths and religious traditions) and issued a letter giving notice of retention/non-destruction of documents to the leaders of 18 prominent religious organisations.”

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
  • Who Was Online   87 Users were Online in the Last 24 Hours   (Most members ever online in 24 hour was 87, last accomplished on .)

  • Forum Statistics

    59,333
    Total Topics
    104,952
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    15,925
    Total Members
    1,592
    Most Online
    Asykaluk
    Newest Member
    Asykaluk
    Joined




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.