Jump to content

TheWorldNewsOrg

This dog pulls himself out of a pond with his teeth after falling through thin ice, when a Missouri...

Topic Summary

Created

Last Reply

Replies

Views

TheWorldNewsOrg -
Colin Browne -
41
1259

Top Posters


Recommended Posts

On 2/13/2018 at 6:48 AM, Colin Browne said:

“The one showing favour to the lowly is lending to Jehovah” (Prov. 19:17, 18) Seeing our God Jehovah considered these, he expects that we do the same. The person in the picture is a bush dweller carrying all his possessions. About 15 years ago when he passed our home, our gardener called him in and we paid him for allowing us take the photograph. The gardener said he is mentally disabled and harmless. We also noticed that he never begs and walks around all day looking for scraps in dustbins. WeÂ’ve seen strangers giving him things to eat and money and we did the same. Seeing that such ones cannot read nor understand the Bible, Jehovah in his mercy settled our concern for their future: “He raises the lowly one from the dust; He lifts up the poor from the ash heap, To make them sit with princes, Giving them a seat of honor. To Jehovah belong earthÂ’s supports, And he places the productive land upon them.” (1Samuel 2:8; Psalm 113:7)

 

 

Rag man.JPG

The uploaded document prepared a year ago may be of use to any interested persons.

WorldNewsMedia Upload.docx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Cancer Does Not Stop Local Jehovah's Witness Couple

      Leslie and Jim Donigan attend the Jehovah's Witnesses conference today at Silverstein Eye Centers Arena in Independence, Missouri. (Mike Sherry | Flatland)
      At happy moments, Jim and Leslie Donigan often find themselves dancing to “Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars,” the Andy Williams hit that has been their song since they first met at a pizza joint in Mission, Kansas, decades ago.
      One of those dance-worthy occasions took place late last year, at the end of a long medical journey. The memory remains strong, even though they have hit a recent bump in the road.
      As Jehovah’s Witnesses, they plan to attend the Midwest convention that runs today through Sunday at Silverstein Eye Centers Arena in Independence, Missouri. Organizers believe few attendees embody this year’s theme, “Don’t Give Up,” more than the Donigans, who are both 71 years old and live in Kansas City. About 5,000 people are expected to attend, said Craig Cochran, the convention’s media services coordinator.
      The ability to be part of a global experience of faith is important to the Donigans, as they once again face medical uncertainty. “It’s like a spiritual family reunion,” Jim said.
      A website for the religion says there are more than 8.3 million Jehovah’s Witnesses in 240 countries. According to the Pew Research Center, fewer than 1 percent of American adults are Jehovah’s Witnesses.

      “Don’t Give Up” is the them of this year’s Jehovah’s Witness conference. (Mike Sherry | Flatland)
      Jehovah’s Witnesses believe in God, who is called Jehovah.  As Christians, they believe in heaven and salvation, but they do not believe in hell or eternal suffering.
      Witnesses, as followers are called, believe the Bible to be the inspired word of God. However, they recognize some parts are symbolic and do not believe all parts of the Bible are to be understood literally.
      Jehovah’s Witnesses also do not believe in blood transfusions, based upon their reading of passages in both the Old and New testaments. They cite Genesis 9:4, for example, where God says, “Only flesh with its soul — its blood — you must not eat.”
      No ‘Cowards in the Foxhole’
      On Oct. 1, 2004, Leslie fainted. That was abnormal for her, a runner who lives a healthy lifestyle.
      Doctors could not pinpoint a cause, and later that month they understood why: They found a gastrointestinal stromal tumor, a rare cancer that leaves no blood marker. The tumor was growing on a section of the small intestine and was also threatening her pancreas.
      The belief about blood transfusions was an obvious complication when it came to surgery.
      So, the Donigans worked through a Jehovah’s Witnesses group in Brooklyn to find Dr. Marvin Romsdahl, a surgeon at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, who performed a modified version of a common surgery to remove pancreatic tumors. The modified version did not require a transfusion.
      The night before the surgery, the anesthesiologist backed out because of the risks of doing surgery without blood transfusions. “That’s good,” Jim told Romsdahl. “We don’t need any cowards in the foxhole.”
      The surgery lasted 13.5 hours, but it was successful.
      Yet further treatment included a prescription for the chemotherapy pill Gleevec. The cost of the therapy, which Leslie said at the time cost $2,500 per month, brought them to the breaking point, even after using Social Security and Medicare.
      “It’s always been more than we could swallow,” Jim said, “and progressively over time, it took everything.”
      More bad news hit in 2008, when Jim lost his banking job during the recession. They had to sell the house they had built nearly four decades before, the same house where they had raised their three children.
      But in one sliver of good news, a neighbor approached them during their garage sale and told them he would buy another house for sale on the block and then rent it to them.
      Things began to look up, as Jim found another job, Leslie qualified for a hardship program that allowed her to take Gleevec for free, and then got off the medication altogether when her cancer went into remission.
      The cancer returned, however, and Leslie must remain on Gleevec for the rest of her life. Now, Gleevec costs $13,000 per month, she said.
      Another Test
      In April 2016, the family was tested again, when Jim started having shortness of breath.
      Their first thought was a heart problem, but the first diagnosis was multiple myeloma, a form of incurable blood cancer. A second opinion was different, but not any better: a form of Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which causes tumors to grow in the lymphatic system.
      A PET scan revealed 100 tumors, and Jim started his own costly round of chemotherapy.

      The Donigans vist with their son, Joel, and his wife, Carrie, at the conference. (Mike Sherry | Flatland)
       
      His lymphatic system failed during treatment, causing fluid buildup around his stomach and lungs. Jim suffered malnutrition when draining the fluid removed electrolytes and proteins.
      By October, doctors gave him two months to live. Leslie got it in writing.
      Yet as he sat in the hospital, saying his goodbyes, Jim had a thought: “Why couldn’t we take those fluids from my stomach and put them back into my heart, where they need to be?”
      The question sparked an idea for one of Jim’s doctors, who inserted a shunt normally used to treat cirrhosis. Within two weeks, the fluid buildup was gone.
      On Dec. 27, when he was home filing paperwork, Jim came across the letter telling him he only had two months to live. He did the math, and then they had an “I ain’t dead yet party.”
      At the party, Jim sipped his first glass of wine in a year, and the couple danced once again to their favorite song. The luster remained up until this week, when an infection flared up around the shunt, and the fear of cancer returned.
      This most recent medical challenge has shown Jim and Leslie how important their faith is in preparing them for the troubles that can lie ahead. The convention, and especially its theme, is coming at just the right time to help guide them through this newest trial, Leslie said.
      “No one is shielded from the human experience,” Leslie said. “But personally, we find it better to be prepared to keep these types of relapses in their proper perspective.”
      — Catherine Wheeler is a multimedia intern for Flatland. She is a graduate student studying journalism at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Catherine has a bachelor’s degree in English-Writing from Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado. She currently lives in Kansas City. You can reach her at cwheeler@kcpt.org
      https://www.flatlandkc.org/beyond-belief/swaying-music/
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Jehovah’s Witnesses from across the region are preparing for their annual convention next month in St. Charles, Missouri.
      A message of persevering with hope over the daily struggles of life is the theme of the two consecutive weekends, July 21 and July 28, at Family Arena in St. Charles.
      “Most would agree that we live in a world of uncertainty so the significance of this event is to show how God supplies endurance to all sorts of people today,” said Bob Valenti, media services overseer for Jehovah’s Witnesses.
      The convention features talks and interviews by some of the church’s elders. There will also be guest speakers from Jehovah’s Witnesses’ world headquarters in Warwick, New York.
      Valenti said that what draws most people to the convention is the public discourses Sundays at 11:20 a.m.
      “This will prove to be most encouraging. In addition to the entire event, it will show how individuals and families can enjoy a happy life,” Valenti said. “Our attendees walked away with renewed hope.”
      All sessions are free.
      For more information, go to bit.ly/1oA5CA1 [www.jw.org/en/jehovahs-witnesses/conventions/].
      http://myjournalcourier.com/news/110423/jehovahs-witnesses-readying-annual-convention
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Jehovah’s Witnesses will hold two weekend annual conventions at the St. Charles Family Arena, 2002 Arena Pkwy, St Charles, MO 63303. The first three-day event begins on Friday, July 21, 2017; the second three-day event begins on Friday, July 28, 2017.
      For detailed information and a program please visit this link:https://www.jw.org/en/jehovahs-witnesses/conventions/
      The 2017 convention of Jehovah’s Witnesses, entitled “Don’t Give Up!”, shows how to enjoy a happy life now and gain a real hope for the future. Featured will be talks, interviews and multimedia so that all in attendance can discover how the Bible and even nature teach lessons about how to endure in today’s world. A highlight of the program, the public Bible discourse on Sunday at 11:20 am, will provide encouragement to: “Never Give Up Hope”. All sessions are free and no collection plates are passed.
      http://www.thescoopnewspaper.com/node/3995
    • By The Librarian
      Their parents died violent deaths. Now grandparents of 7 Glen Carbon children fighting for guardianship
      EDWARDSVILLE • Seven children from Glen Carbon whose parents died in March are now at the center of a struggle over guardianship between their paternal grandparents and their maternal grandmother.
      According to court documents, Nancy and Henry Campbell of Glen Carbon, the children’s paternal grandparents, filed a petition for guardianship after the parents, Cristy and Justin Campbell, died March 16. More than a month later, Cristy Campbell’s mother, Lenora Brueggemann of Caseyville, filed a counterpetition for guardianship that alleged Nancy and Henry Campbell were forcing the children, five boys and two girls, ages 5 months to 14 years, to adopt a lifestyle that harms their mental health.
      The counterpetition claims that Nancy and Henry Campbell have:
        • Forced the children to adopt the couple’s religion, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and to seek converts by going door to door.
      • Banned contact between the children and Brueggemann because Brueggemann is not a Jehovah’s Witness.
      • Planned to have the children discontinue their extracurricular activities, including sports.
      The document says Brueggemann was the primary alternate child care provider for the children before their parents’ deaths. Brueggemann was unable to house all seven children after their parents’ deaths, but the petition says she is working on securing an adequate living situation.
      Read more...
      http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/their-parents-died-violent-deaths-now-grandparents-of-glen-carbon/article_e9def219-d5b4-5f31-8c46-4681c520f334.html
         
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Un día de lluvia no detuvo este grupo de precursoras en Desloge, Missouri, Estados Unidos,  de salir todo el día y encontrar un montón de gente en casa! Grandes resultados hoy. ¡Alabado sea Jah!
       
       

    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      A day of rain did not stop this group of pioneers in Desloge, Missouri from going in service  all day and find plenty of people at home! Great results today. 
       

  • Forum Statistics

    61,662
    Total Topics
    114,375
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    16,503
    Total Members
    1,592
    Most Online
    Guticolu
    Newest Member
    Guticolu
    Joined




  • Topics

  • Posts

    • IF holy spirit reached anyone in the JW Org it would be a great surprise to me.   IF holy spirit reached the congregants then would they carry on serving the GB and the Org ? IF holy spirit reached the congregants then would they still go into the 'ministry work' teaching the LIES to other people ? Would congregants take on Bible Studies and teach LIES of men from books, by not using the Bible properly ?  Would congregants encourage families into the K H knowing that there may be a paedophile in there ? Well the congregants would know about the paedophile situation, if  the congregants were blessed with holy spirit.  No, there is no holy spirit in the JW Org. If ever there was, which I cannot now believe, it has vanished. Almighty God has turned the 'tap' off. And you, Mr Rook, will know this more than I. Because you see the faults and lies, the injustice and lack of love, the lack of mercy, the man made rules as a heavy burden (as you mentioned).       
    • It would be nice to see any written 'rules' made by the GB or others in regard to shunning a person that has left the JW Org. Maybe JW congregants should be issued with a GB rule book of do's and don'ts. That way every one would know exactly what procedure is right when serving the GB and it's Org.   My feeling is that in the first century, all those that became true Christians, serving God through Christ, were of the Anointed, heavenly calling. Therefore it was more important for them to be 'without spot from the world'.  So stricter discipline would be more acceptable to those of the Anointed class. 'To whom more is given, more will be demanded'.  Hence IMO, the scriptures are written for the Anointed, and then the Anointed should teach the earthly class. (The GB are not of the anointed. By their works you will know them).  So then @Srecko Sostar the questions would be more complicated. Should stricter rules apply to the Anointed than to the earthly class ?  The Anointed should be inspired of holy spirit and capable of more self control........ All those scriptures were written by Anointed ones for Anointed ones at that time.    
    • They are that these are not your words. Who wrote this?
    • Thanks! If you go to listen and watch some other videos, you will also notice how she, Lara, going  complètement  with emotions through song while singing.   
    • ma nouvelle chanteuse française préférée
    • In the OT, there is a direct command, “Thou shalt not kill (murder)!” This command should contain God's view of human life, which emphasizes that life is holy, sacred before God, but also that people must have the same feeling about the lives of other people around them. By reading the Bible, which describes the events before and after the occurrence of this commandment, we can see that this commandment has no absolute power. Within the same set of legal provisions, there are other commandments that were binding on the Israelites, too. For example, commands like; "Don't steal, don't lie, don't commit fornication ...". These commandments should never have been ignored or mitigated by some extraordinary circumstances. The specificity of this commandment, "You shall not kill," is evident in the fact that it was not of valid, obligation for all men and for all circumstances. Powerful individuals in Israel sometimes making their own decisions to go on military campaigns against others (Israelis and non-Israelis) The law also justified killing for revenge. In some other places, God commands the death penalty against an individual. Also, the Bible describes that God instituted great actions that justified killing of other people. These were most often military actions aimed at killing soldiers of the enemy army, but also their families. The killings of these other tribes and people were justified on the basis of several facts: 1) they were not Israelis  2) they lived in territory that the Israel nation were to conquer for themselves, 3) they belonged to other religions. The execution of the death penalty for a crime still exists today in some societies and legal systems. Obviously, the death penalty decision is based on balance. The one who killed must be killed. But from some other biblical examples we have seen that murder is not the only crime punishable by death. The disobedient child was also sentenced to death. Different religious affiliations or different religious beliefs also led to the death penalty. Adultery was punished by death. From what we have described so far, we can see how the command, "shall not kill," had a stretched meaning. It is therefore necessary to look at religious practices that are not new but may draw some parallels in symbolism and meaning. As you may already guessed, it is about an act of symbolic "killing" that is carried out in such a way to exclude (disfellowship) another person from a particular social (religious) group in a specific way - by ignoring aka shunning. Shunning (this is about JW organization in particular) can be made because of two conclusions. The first conclusion is reached by an individual JW member who believes that another member of the congregation has wronged/sinned against the Bible and its principles to the extent that he / she personally presents a spiritual anomaly (in the form of a spiritual illness or threat) and decides to "label" particular person as inappropriate for him to have socializing contacts. He seeks to avoid contact and minimize any literal and spiritual communion. In second conclusion, the conviction of the inappropriateness of a member is made by the body of the elders. The judgment may be based on the morally inappropriate behavior of an individual member, or it may be that an individual no longer agrees with the ideological and organizational structure or with the theological solutions of the organization what made him/her as "hostile element". This is when a person is removed from congregational members aka "spiritually killed" in such a way to excommunicate (dfd) them (he,she) from the community and impose a ban on almost every contact with the dfd person. The ban has few variations and interpretations of how the shunning should be carried out. But the very core of such a demand not to contact the excluded person is evident from the widespread practice that JW members have consistently implemented - the excluded (dfd) is not even greeted with the simplest “Good afternoon” greeting (hallo) on the street. JW's want to be peaceful people who go to jail in some countries because not want even to carry weapon in mandatory military service. They don't want take self-defense courses even for protect themselves when attacked. But they are motivated to be active in using spiritual weapons and warfare against ex members who are in a disagreement with doctrinal issues. And "killing" them with shunning.   What are your thoughts?       
    • Absolutament incroyable!
  • Popular Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.