Jump to content
The World News Media

Cart Witnessing


homesolution2011
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Member

Can anyone please share the guidelines set forth from the governing body regarding cart witnessing. I have a disabled sister that would love to take part

in the PW campaign but was instructed she can not sit down during her assignment any longer. She was told that maybe the cart witnessing wasn't for her

to find another avenue of service??    (She can stand for 30 to 45 minutes then must sit for 10 to 15 minutes)

Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • Views 574
  • Replies 3
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Relevant extract from July 15, 2014 letter to the BOE: 8. Determining who may participate in public witnessing: The Congregation Service Committee will select qualified publishers to participate

  • Member
1 hour ago, homesolution2011@aol.com said:

Can anyone please share the guidelines set forth from the governing body regarding cart witnessing. I have a disabled sister that would love to take part

in the PW campaign but was instructed she can not sit down during her assignment any longer. She was told that maybe the cart witnessing wasn't for her

to find another avenue of service??    (She can stand for 30 to 45 minutes then must sit for 10 to 15 minutes)

There's a 2015 KM article, "How to Witness Using a Literature Display", that has some suggestions: http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/202015126?q=cart+witnessing&p=par

These are the do's and don't's listed in it:

Do:
  • Be friendly, welcoming, and helpful to passersby. Some publishers give a warm, genuine smile and say a friendly greeting. If someone looks at the display as he passes by, you might say, “You can take something if you like.”

  • Stand at an appropriate distance from the display. In some places publishers experience success when they stand within a few feet of the display. Others find that this method makes passersby hesitant to stop, so they stand a little farther away and wait until someone stops at the display. Once a person approaches the display, try to engage him in conversation, perhaps by asking, “Have you ever thought about that question before?”

  • Use the Bible as often as possible.

  • Explain the Bible study arrangement to anyone who takes one of our study publications, such as the Bible Teach book. Offer to play the video Why Study the Bible? on an electronic device.

  • Obtain contact information from interested ones when possible. If the person does not live in your territory, fill out a Please Follow Up (S-43) form, and give it to the secretary as soon as possible.

Don’t:
  • Be aggressive, insistent, or pushy or stand next to the display like a sentinel.

  • View this form of witnessing as simply a way to distribute literature. When we are in the ministry, our goal is to start Bible studies, so we should try to engage individuals in conversation.

  • Block the display or become too engrossed in conversation with your partner. If you must use your cell phone for a personal call, it is usually best to step away from the display.

  • Get involved in debates with opposers. If an opposer becomes abusive, it may be necessary to move to another location.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member
37 minutes ago, HollyW said:

These are the do's and don't's listed in it:

“Since you died with Christ to the elemental spiritual forces of this world, why, as though you still belonged to the world, do you submit to its rules:  “Do not handle! Do not taste! Do not touch!”?  These rules, which have to do with things that are all destined to perish with use, are based on merely human commands and teachings.  Such regulations indeed have an appearance of wisdom, with their self-imposed worship, their false humility and their harsh treatment of the body, but they lack any value in restraining sensual indulgence.” Col 2:20-23

“Who is it he is trying to teach?
    To whom is he explaining his message?
To children weaned from their milk,
    to those just taken from the breast?
 For it is:
    Do this, do that,
    a rule for this, a rule for that;
    a little here, a little there.”

 Very well then, with foreign lips and strange tongues
    God will speak to this people,
 to whom he said,
    “This is the resting place, let the weary rest”;
and, “This is the place of repose”—
    but they would not listen.

 So then, the word of the Lord to them will become:
    Do this, do that,
    a rule for this, a rule for that;
    a little here, a little there—
so that as they go they will fall backward;
    they will be injured and snared and captured.  Isa 28:9-13

 “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.  For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.” Matt 11:28-30

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member
On 8/3/2016 at 9:29 PM, homesolution2011@aol.com said:

Can anyone please share the guidelines set forth from the governing body regarding cart witnessing. I have a disabled sister that would love to take part

in the PW campaign but was instructed she can not sit down during her assignment any longer. She was told that maybe the cart witnessing wasn't for her

to find another avenue of service??    (She can stand for 30 to 45 minutes then must sit for 10 to 15 minutes)

Relevant extract from July 15, 2014 letter to the BOE:

8. Determining who may participate in public witnessing: The Congregation Service Committee will select qualified publishers to participate in this feature of the ministry. Those selected should be known to present themselves in a dignified way. Their appearance and dress should be professional, well-arranged, and modest. Those selected should demonstrate discernment and a willingness to witness in different public settings, should enjoy and promote good relations with others, should be committed to taking the assignment seriously, and should be willing to cooperate with the body of elders. 

9. If it is possible and practical, the service overseer or someone designated by the body of elders should organize a midweek and weekend schedule for each selected location. There is an advantage to having the literature displays set up in the same location, on the same days, and at the same times. They serve as a constant feature readily recognized by those in the area.  

10. It is usually best for two or more persons to be assigned to work together. The safety of participants as well as their varying abilities should be taken into account when scheduling. Partners should remain watchful over each other since the conditions in a normally safe area can unexpectedly change.—Prov. 22:3; Eccl. 4:10, 12. [emphasis in red mine]

There is nothing in there about not being allowed to sit or disabled people barred from taking part (discrimination!). In fact, whenever I see a literature cart in my town, the JWs are often sitting. If what you describe is all there is to it, it sounds like your local elders are making up unnecessary rules.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share





×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.