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‘Would robot sex count as infidelity?

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@TheWorldNewsOrg I kinda spoke about this before but kept it PG because everything regarding sex robots is actually true and it is explicit. There is also a far, darker side to this stuff to and I rather not say.

 

However, those who do take up an inanimate object have given themselves over to sexual gratification in this regard, not to far from the VR counterpart regarding Virtual Reality, in a sense, it is identical to the movie that came out some months ago, Ready Player One. If this has already been achieved, and the robots, they can go even further with this stuff and next thing you know it will be all over the place.

This will result in the churches to take precautions because such can pose as a literal danger to the people.

I remember one time, I debated with someone about the early church, this guy was an atheist, and when we got to A.I.and robots, he admits he has one of these robots or dolls hidden underneath his bed and clearly this was something I did not want to hear, granted at the time I was a a young man and didn't know these things, as a young adult now, I know what these things are now.

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@James Thomas Rook Jr. Make sure the new robot does not take up the name James Tronic Rook Jr. Because next thing you know, he or IT will find a way to replace you. If you fight back, it will win and next thing you know we will soon have SKYNET.

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32 minutes ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

...looks like an AAdam's family barn.

Yes with over 50 rooms 

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12 hours ago, JOHN BUTLER said:

Yes with over 50 rooms 

At least most of those cars finally got cleared off the lot. "Urban Explorers" must still be a problem, though. I read somewhere that they keep breaking locks and cutting fences just to take a selfie at a place like this. Right?

Looks like quite a project. Perhaps someday it could become a "Wyndham" hotel.

Seriously, however, especially if permission to add the two 70 foot towers and botanical gardens works out, it would be a great place for corporate events, weddings, etc. In the US, we often made use of these out of the way locations for corporate events. Attendance was always low when events were held in Las Vegas, Atlanta, etc., and much higher at captive locations. With those planned hiking trails it would remind me of the last three I went to:

  1. Mohonk House in New Paltz, New York
  2. and another one in Amish/Mennonite country in rural Ohio,
  3. and another one in Asheville, North Carolina, The [Vander]Biltmore).

I don't know how popular this idea is in the UK, but a French company I worked for would send us to a Bordeaux winery (that they owned) and then a "Club Med" in Normandy that was not a typical water-sports oriented Club Med. It was designed with a lot of garden-like pools and little bridges based on Monet/Manet paintings.

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3 hours ago, JOHN BUTLER said:

I live a real life, not fantasy world stuff. My wife and I do occasionally snuggle up on the sofa and watch a film on Netflix. But it would be something we'd choose between us and not on a regular basis.

I'm deeply involved in auctions and 'caretaker' of a semi derelict mansion, so i'm busy enough and getting out lots. 

What do you think of 'my' house then ? 

 

2.jpg

Wow, it's fantastic! Looks like a lot of work on the pillars, will they be able to be restored to their original beauty?

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4 hours ago, JW Insider said:

planned hiking trails

One thing that upset me when I moved to the USA was the realisation that one cannot just walk anywhere. In Europe, for the most part, everyone has "the right to roam" which means you can pretty much go anywhere, even on privately owned land. In America, most land is owned by someone, and that someone does not tolerate anyone walking through their property. I'm sure @James Thomas Rook Jr. wouldn't hesitate to put a bullet through your head. There are "parks" but those parks are rarely within walking distance. You might have perfect hiking acreage right behind your house, but if it doesn't belong to you,  you can't go there. In England, most privately owned fields and meadows can be accessed by pedestrians and hikers (including their free running dogs, in America you can only let your dog run in a dog park) through a style or "kissing gate". Trails are made naturally by people frequently walking there, not by someone preparing them specially for that purpose. Farmers who drive tractors through a field leave a path, and people walk on those too. As long as you do not infringe on someones garden (yard) around the house (which is usually fenced anyway) you are not trespassing. Of course there is the odd grumpy farmer who puts up "do not trespass" signs in a field, but there are not many....

So in view of that, hiking trails are not really a planned thing in England in the same sense as in America. Of course there are nature reserves, where there are sign posted trails, but generally, in the rural countryside, (where John Buttler's house is) there is no need for them. The same goes for Scotland. In fact I think now you can also put a tent up anywhere, and you can fish and canoe on all the rivers, even if it cuts through someones land.

In Switzerland, you can hike anywhere as well, and you don't have to stick to trails. The whole alpine region is completely and freely accessible to everyone. As for other European states, it's pretty much the same. Oh, and all the nature reserves are "free". They are paid for by the state.

So apparently America is the land of the free. Not in my mind xD  The book "trespassing across America" sounds interesting.....

kissing_gate_haysden_country_park-_-_geograph-org-uk_-_189742.jpg

 

81160149-tractor-trails-in-perfect-wheat-field-.jpg

This almost looks identical to the field behind my mum's house. One year it was growing rapeseed and it was amazing walking through a field of pure yellow...

 

 

 

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We are going over to the 'the house' this morning. The sun is shining here but the air is cold. Will add more later 

 

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8 hours ago, Anna said:

One thing that upset me when I moved to the USA was the realisation that one cannot just walk anywhere. 

Unfortunately, lawyers cooled off much of that. When trespassers began suffering injuries on private property & owners were sued for it, many responded by making their property off-limits.

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2 minutes ago, TrueTomHarley said:

Unfortunately, lawyers cooled off much of that. When trespassers began suffering injuries on private property & owners were sued for it, many responded by making their property off-limits.

Because of peoples' reactions, I even had to stop digging holes in the back yard, at night by flashlight, in the rain.

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At least most of those cars finally got cleared off the lot. "Urban Explorers" must still be a problem, though. I read somewhere that they keep breaking locks and cutting fences just to take a selfie at a place like this. Right?

The cars were cleared by the previous owner who had used the house and grounds as a vehicle salvage / scrap yard. He had vehicle parts all over the house and grounds. My wife and I filled a large scrap metal bin with huge amount of scrap which when weighed in earnt the present owner a bit of cash. 

The present owner also hired a 'mini digger' and small dumper truck for my wife and i to clear some earth and rubbish with. It gave us 'new skills' and we didn't wreck the place. 

Urban explorers have been a big problem but in the last two months things have gone quiet so hopefully it will stay quiet for a long time now. 

But the sun shone brightly today whilst we were there and parts of it looked quite nice, in a derelict sort of way :) 

 

Blacvk bro and Vid of Sharon 021.JPG

Tuesday 10th July Blacckky 023.JPG

Monday 29 Oct and black bro 142.JPG

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12 hours ago, Anna said:

One thing that upset me when I moved to the USA was the realisation that one cannot just walk anywhere. In Europe, for the most part, everyone has "the right to roam" which means you can pretty much go anywhere, even on privately owned land. In America, most land is owned by someone, and that someone does not tolerate anyone walking through their property. I'm sure @James Thomas Rook Jr. wouldn't hesitate to put a bullet through your head. There are "parks" but those parks are rarely within walking distance. You might have perfect hiking acreage right behind your house, but if it doesn't belong to you,  you can't go there. In England, most privately owned fields and meadows can be accessed by pedestrians and hikers (including their free running dogs, in America you can only let your dog run in a dog park) through a style or "kissing gate". Trails are made naturally by people frequently walking there, not by someone preparing them specially for that purpose. Farmers who drive tractors through a field leave a path, and people walk on those too. As long as you do not infringe on someones garden (yard) around the house (which is usually fenced anyway) you are not trespassing. Of course there is the odd grumpy farmer who puts up "do not trespass" signs in a field, but there are not many....

So in view of that, hiking trails are not really a planned thing in England in the same sense as in America. Of course there are nature reserves, where there are sign posted trails, but generally, in the rural countryside, (where John Buttler's house is) there is no need for them. The same goes for Scotland. In fact I think now you can also put a tent up anywhere, and you can fish and canoe on all the rivers, even if it cuts through someones land.

In Switzerland, you can hike anywhere as well, and you don't have to stick to trails. The whole alpine region is completely and freely accessible to everyone. As for other European states, it's pretty much the same. Oh, and all the nature reserves are "free". They are paid for by the state.

So apparently America is the land of the free. Not in my mind xD  The book "trespassing across America" sounds interesting.....

kissing_gate_haysden_country_park-_-_geograph-org-uk_-_189742.jpg

 

81160149-tractor-trails-in-perfect-wheat-field-.jpg

This almost looks identical to the field behind my mum's house. One year it was growing rapeseed and it was amazing walking through a field of pure yellow...

 

 

 

Anna we do have 'Public Foot Paths' here in England and also 'Bridle paths' all of which have sign posts. In fact we noticed a few weeks ago, a lady with a clipboard, looking rather 'official', walking past 'our big house'. When we left and locked up the gates we noticed new 'arrow' stickers on gate posts.  Unfortunately there is a public right of way right by  the side of the house. Nice for genuine people but makes it easier for urban explorers to get a good look at the property before breaking in. We can't stop anyone being on the outside just looking of course, but some folks are more welcome than others. We do show some folks around and let them take a few photos too. 

Here is Devon we have those gates (in your photo) and also styles to climb over. And people are expected to keep to the edges on farmers fields. The good farmer would clear a footpath around the edge, some do, some don't.  But yes it is almost 'free to roam' which has it's good and bad points, depending if you are the land owner. 

As far as the House is concerned, the new owner wants to go far beyond restoration, and the locals are totally opposed to it all. The owner wants to turn it into a massive wedding venue, for rich folks. (He's a Londoner, big business man, property and such) He wants to extend what is now the cellar, outward under the side of the house to form some sort of paved garden or similar. And he wants to add other buildings in the large grounds for other uses. Will cost millions of pounds and take at least three years i would think...

But for my wife and i it was a great challenge, getting it cleaned out and tidied up a bit. So it now looks like a house not a scrap yard..... I also had to arrange for the car parts to go into one auction and lots of furniture to go into a different auction.  The car parts / Automobilia Auction i was also involved deeply in because I help that auctioneer lay it all out and put the Lot numbers on everything.  So being part of both the auctions this month has been a challenge too. :)  The furniture auction was today (Monday) so I haven't heard any results from it yet. But in November i may just spend more time on here, sitting, relaxing, eating mince pies and drinking tea. 

 

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To some. Self-gratification is not considered a sin. They will justify this with scripture. Desires of the heart can seem complex. Does scripture specifically mention masturbation? No, but the intent of sexual desire does. The word desire can be seen in a cocktail of the seven deadly sins.

In scripture, just by desiring someone else’s wife is looked as committing adultery. What scripture can we make light off to confirm self-gratification is a desire and thus a sexbot would be part of. Galatians 5:16-26

In God’s eyes, you can have fun, but there will ultimately be at a price. Infidelity runs hand on hand with adultery. The commonality is desire. With or without a partner. A Christian is not being faithful to God’s word of sexual immorality.

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