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Former U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas, said during CNN's Equality Town Hall with Democratic presidential candidates that religious churches, colleges, and organizations should lose their tax-exempt status if they oppose same sex marriage.

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  L'ancien représentant américain Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas, a déclaré lors de l'assemblée publique de CNN sur l'égalité avec les candidats démocrates à la présidence que les églises, collèges et organisations religieuses devraient perdre leur statut exonéré d'impôt si elles s'opposent au mariage homosexuel.

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Guest Level 9 Swordsman

Democrats are insane. 2020 is going to be a crazy year in clown world. They can't do this to Christian folks. And Christians who support something like this should be watched carefully. 

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Though it is not in a portion of the Bible known for prophesy, the most striking prophesy of all to me is Romans 1:26-28

That is why God gave them over to uncontrolled sexual passion, for their females changed the natural use of themselves into one contrary to nature;  likewise also the males left the natural use of the female and became violently inflamed in their lust toward one another, males with males”

Though the flavor of the verse is seems clearly “anti-gay,” for the purposes of this comment that need not be considered. When I became a Witness in the 1970s, I thought this verse was way way out there, not realistic at all. Of course, there had always been homosexuality, but to suggest that it would one day go viral seemed absurd. Yet it has happened. Even gays themselves, though they will be happy at the extent that they have been able to make progress, must be surprised at how quickly it has come about.

The pace accelerates and spreads to new frontiers. Whereas gays have taken decades to enter the mainstream, the embrace of the transgender movement have taken mere months. Gayle King (I heard her say this on CBS This Morning) did not know what the Q stood for when she obediently appended it to LGBT. Did it mean “questioning?” Or “queer?” She didn’t know. But she didn’t dare not include it.

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