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Man, 69, sues to lower age 20 years: ‘You can change your gender. Why not your age?’...

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From the Notebook's of Lazarus Long:

"This sad little lizard told me that he was a brontosaurus on his mother’s side. I did not laugh; people who boast of ancestry often have little else to sustain them. Humoring them costs nothing and adds to happiness in a world in which happiness is always in short supply."

Same thing here, only about age.

If he self identifies as a Hippopotamus, that would be OK with me, as long as he gives up his driver's license.

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Wait a minute!!  This guy may be on to something!!

I want to retire early... can you see the ramifications?

:o

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