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World Water Day: 2.1 billion people are living without safe drinking water and one after other town...

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James Thomas Rook Jr. -
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2 hours ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

Move to where there IS clean water.

Or, learn how to purify water at home ... with a box, gravel, sand and some household bleach.

If you stare at trees ... it does not provide clean water.

Adapt and improvise YOURSELF!!

At times it does not always work out that way, the same can be said about food supplies, resources, etc. at the same time, a risk. At times support of other resources that aren't for helping begets the very problems that cause some of these things that people succumb to.

All in all, should one choose, there is probably 50/50 chance.

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      Reprinted from Climatewire with permission from Environment & Energy Publishing, LLC. www.eenews.net, 202-628-6500
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