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Abaddon, also known as Apollyon - The Angel of the Abyss


Space Merchant
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I will address the below briefly because apparently when someone "calls" you to claim, they run away from even the basics of asking. I will also repost key points of a debate I had regarding this topic with better quotations, this because when forums update, some words or punctuations turn into symbols.

What is Abaddon, and what does that name/title means:


Abaddon (אֲבַדּוֹן‎) is a Hebrew term, that derives Avaddon, meaning either Destruction or Doom. Like the Hebrew term, the Greek equivalent  is Apollyon (Ἀπολλύων) which means Destroyer [The Destroyer]. This appears in the Scriptures in both instances, in regards to a place of destruction, as for the angel in question, it is interpreted as an Archangel of the abyss. 


Who is Abbadon:


As shown in the other thread, it is obvious as to what the name/title means, however, it was never addressed who it is, clearly there is reason behind that because there are only 2 sides concerning the Angel of the Abyss - one good, and one bad, which can make or break a viewpoint not only verily easily, but quickly. Running from such does not help either. For this angel is very well connected with the Locust Army itself. In the Hebrew text, Abaddon is used with reference to a Bottomless Pit, often appearing alongside the place שְׁאוֹל (Sheol), meaning the realm of the dead.

Notes:


Hebrew Text


The term Abaddon appears six times in the Masoretic text of the Hebrew Bible; Abaddon means destruction or "place of destruction", or the realm of the dead, and is accompanied by Sheol. In the Hebrew Old Testament, Abaddon, is mentioned several times, in a sense, often in reference to the grave (Job 26:6; 28:22; 31:12; Psalms 88:11; Proverbs 15:11; 27:20). Even when it comes to oral traditions of legends of Rabbinical Literature, Abaddon is identified as a separate realm where those in damnation are laid dead in both fire and snow, moreover, shown as one of several places in Gehenna that Moses the Levite has visited.

Greek Text

We see the appears of Abaddon in the Greek text as well. In Revelation 9:11, this is the first known depiction of Abaddon as an individual entity instead of a place. Because of this, this left the identity of Abaddon open to interpretation. In 1708, a Protestant, Matthew Henry believed Abaddon, to be The Antichrist, another such as Jamieson-Fausset Brown in 1871, as well as Henry Hampton Halley in 1922, didn't believe Abaddon to be The Antichrist, but rather, Satan the Devil. This is also in contrast for some the Methodist publication, The Interpreter's Bible, which  states that Abaddon is an angel, but not of Satan, instead, but from God, performing his work of destruction at God's bidding, all this by citing the context at Revelations 20:1-3. Likewise, for most Restorationist, including Jehovah's Witnesses, also cite Revelation 20:1-3 where the angel having the key of the abyss is actually shown to be a representative of God, which brings the conclusion of Abaddon being Jesus (Michael for some), in title after resurrection.


Secondary Notes:


Destroyer can equate to other things/persons as well


1 Corinthians 10:7-10, this passage is about Apostle Paul’s focus on those of Israel who succumb to murmuring and putting God to the test, and the "Destroyer" here is regarding God’s messenger sent to destroy – that is, if you take into account the context of the references.


Isaiah 33:1 or chapter 33 in general is regarding the "Destroyer" (The Assyrian/Assyria). Who in turn is eventually destroyed by another, an Angel (Angel of Death also known as a Destroyer). For the history of Sennacherib, who is an Assyrian, for Assyria (the Destroyer mentioned in Isaiah 33:1) threatened to destroy Jerusalem, which at the time its ruler being Hezekiah, the son of Ahaz. God responded by sending an Angel, and this Angel, who was sent, took out, or as some would say, steamrolled 185,000 Assyrian Soldiers as they prepared to enter the city (2 Kings 18-19, Isaiah 37:33-38). For none do not see Satan or Jesus, but an Angel, and before that we know of Assyria, who was a Destroyer themselves, thus the God of Hezekiah, going with Prophet Isaiah has said, destroyed the destroyer, which is, Assyria with the destroyer that was sent.


[When you have ceased to destroy, you will be destroyed;]


Another example is that God sent an angel to take action, Hebrews 11:28, the "Destroyer" here was indeed an Angel also known as "The Angel of Death" called by some or other translations. This same verse is a quotation found in Hebrews 11:28 which reads:


By faith he kept the Passover and sprinkled the blood, so that the Destroyer of the firstborn might not touch them.


So we can identify the “Destroyer” here to be an Angel, sent by God during the days of Moses and Aaron and their ordeal with Egypt’s Pharaoh.
With that in mind, the destroyer(s) often relates to enemies of God's people, as is, with those in support of God's people, i.e. angels. in this case. Where does that put Abaddon? Is this person a friend, or is he a foe?


The Good:

The Most Terrifying Figure In The Bible Isn't Satan, It's God's Right-Hand  Man

There are those who later come to understand that Abaddon is an Angel of God, some even assume that Abaddon is the same Angel who had dealt with the Assyrians back in the days of King Hezekiah. Some assume the Angel to be Michael The Archangel, to others, this angel, thus being associated with Michael The Archangel, will say that Abaddon is the Lord himself - Jesus Christ, and the Locust, whom follower their King, are on his side. Abaddon is often spoken of as God's Right Hand.


The Bad:

Abaddon - Wikipedia


Very early on, since the symbolism of Revelations was not 100% understood, there are those who associate Abaddon with Satan The Devil or some unknown Demon. This also led them to believe that The Devil, or this Demon controls an Army of evil Locusts to cause trouble for God's people.


What is Abaddon's role and how does the Locust play into all this:


Abaddon, being the angel of the abyss is very simple - Revelation 9:1-12


He is the one given the keys to the abyss.

  • Revelation 9:1 - And the fifth angel blew his trumpet, and I saw a star fallen from heaven to earth, and he was given the key to the shaft of the bottomless pit.

Not only the Locusts were released, freed from it (Revelations 9:3), it is the same place where Satan the Devil is hurled into the abyss, held in captivity (Revelations 20:3). Some would find this part confusing for if Abaddon was Satan or an ally of Satan, why would he lock up his own boss, with a key given to him? For this point right here is where most of Christendom later changed their understanding, hence restoration, mainly when it came to them having connected Joel and Revelations 100%. Likewise as to the Locust not attacking God's people, or having the spirit poured to them, which rf. Acts 2:39, which drew question and further study as more and more people began to not just read Scripture, but commit themselves to research.

What are Locusts:


Locusts are a group of certain species of short-horned grasshoppers in the family Acrididae that have a swarming phase. These insects are usually solitary, but under certain circumstances they become more abundant and change their behavior and habits, becoming gregarious. No taxonomic distinction is made between locust and grasshopper species; the basis for the definition is whether a species forms swarms under intermittently suitable conditions.
In ancient times, the Study of literature shows how pervasive plagues of locusts were over the course of history. The insects arrived unexpectedly, often after a change of wind direction or weather, and the consequences were devastating. The Ancient Egyptians carved locusts on tombs in the period 2470 to 2220 BC. A devastating plague in Egypt is also mentioned in the Book of Exodus, committed by this swarm. The Iliad mentions locusts taking to the wing to escape fire. Plagues of locusts are also mentioned in the Quran. In the 9th century, the Chinese authorities appointed anti-locust officers, for such a swarm was that intense to deal with.

Who represents the Locusts:


Although some are quick to equate these symbolic representations with demons, a scourge of wickedness, an undead army, etc. They fall to see what this represents, mainly due to the fact the Locusts mentioned here do not harm God's people.


Locusts in figurative use can equate to 2 groups (3 if you count Nahum).


Babylonians - Joel’s prophecy relates to an attack as shown in Joel 1:6; 2:1, 8, and 11, and this attack is concerning Babylonian soldiers which has been revealed in 2:25 to deal with the Israelites who disobeyed God. The army evidently organized and was able to overwhelm the Israelites like, of which they are described as, a Locust swarm. They overran and ransacked the Israelites' dwelling very quickly. Soldiers of the Babylonian Army.


The Locust representation although similar they are different, which brings us to God's people.


God's People - In Revelation 9:1-11. Some in the past connected the Locusts in Joel in relations to the actions and operations of the gospel work, therefore, they make a similar connection in the role of the Locust in the Book of Revelations. The prophecy in question is a swarm of Locusts that  have human faces, adorn golden crowns, and have long hair, and teeth like that of a lion, all going into battle (Revelations 9:7-8) We come to see that they torment those an enemy to God who do not have the seal of God on their foreheads. The connection to Joel also reflects life-span, for there is an limited amount of time, a period of 5 months, for these Locusts to commit their act, something of which is also spoken of in commentary, which is no different from life-span of and operations of literal Locusts.


Words of Nahum concerning Assyrians - Although not the focus, but the representation of Locust can also be equated to The Assyrian Army. Nahum 3:16-17 when they were compared to Locusts that remain in their dwelling in cold weather, thus making them unable to act and remain numb. But the second the sun shines, this will result in them rushing away from their dwelling, fleeing - flying away.


Between the 2 who [focused] represented as Locusts, there is a difference.


Reasons why Joel and Revelations connect with each other via references is because [A] Locusts swarm at great numbers [B] They operate and take various actions.
In this case we can see the differences though, for we have Locusts that attack the Israelites, and the latter only attacks, symbolically, those who are not of God. One swarms as a means to cause problems, the latter, swarms as a means to commit to what God has tasked them. One takes judgement in a way to suppress, the latter proclaims judgement.

What is there role:


The events of old had past, however when Satan is locked away in the abyss, those who represent the Locust are to commit to the work - God's people. But their gospel message will not be good news always, but also judgement.

 

Granted this was talked about for sometime now, everything mentioned is brief, for the other thread was locked due to question dodging.

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I will address the below briefly because apparently when someone "calls" you to claim, they run away from even the basics of asking. I will also repost key points of a debate I had regarding this topic with better quotations, this because when forums update, some words or punctuations turn into symbols. What is Abaddon, and what does that name/title means: Abaddon (אֲבַדּוֹן‎) is a Hebrew term, that derives Avaddon, meaning either Destruction or Doom. Like the Hebrew term, the Greek e

The other thread was locked because you were off topic and just trying to get attention for yourself  

I didn't go off topic. Abaddon has a strong connection to the Locusts. So anyone reading Joel or Revelations has to understand who Abaddon is. You locked it because you didn't want to expose yourself. Granted the WHO factor can make or break anyone's state, which was the case with Witness. You were asked WHO he was not HIS name/title. evidence below: The reason one must know WHO he is, is due to the fact that he controls/leads the Locust Army. Unlike you, I don't cower from

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35 minutes ago, Patiently waiting for Truth said:

The other thread was locked because you were off topic and just trying to get attention for yourself :) 

I didn't go off topic. Abaddon has a strong connection to the Locusts. So anyone reading Joel or Revelations has to understand who Abaddon is. You locked it because you didn't want to expose yourself. Granted the WHO factor can make or break anyone's state, which was the case with Witness.

You were asked WHO he was not HIS name/title.

evidence below:

The reason one must know WHO he is, is due to the fact that he controls/leads the Locust Army.

Unlike you, I don't cower from questions, for I adhere to 2 Timothy 3:16. You? I guess that is for you to find out.

That being said, next time you mention Locust, know what these things are, for a preacher of the gospel, running from such a thing only proves the point Christians and Muslims make about former witnesses. More so, your reaction proves me right.

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15 hours ago, Space Merchant said:

I didn't go off topic

You were totally off topic, because the TOPIC was about the misuse of scriptures by the Watchtower... 

And the GB / Watchtower admitted they were wrong.  Truther ? You can't even tell the truth here. I would think you are a laughing stock amongst real Truthers. 

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What is the common theme by different interpretations?

 

Harper Collins

 

Abaddon (uh-bad′uhn; Heb., “destruction”).

1 In the Hebrew Bible, a place of destruction for the dead (Ps. 88:11; Job 26:6; 28:22; 31:12; Prov. 15:11). The term is typically regarded as a synonym for Sheol (cf. Prov. 27:20); if there is any distinction, it might be that people are sometimes said to be “brought up” or rescued from Sheol, but never from Abaddon. See also abyss; Sheol.

2 In the NT, the Hebrew name for the ruler of the Abyss, whose Greek name was Apollyon, “the Destroyer” (Rev. 9:11). See also abyss; Apollyon.

Apollyon (uh-pol′yuhn; Gk., “the destroyer”), a possible allusion to the Greek god Apollo or, perhaps, to the angel of death (Rev. 9:11). See also Abaddon.

 

Catholic Bible Dictionary

 

ABADDON (Hebrew, “destruction”) The name is used with several meanings. These include ruin and destruction in a broad sense (Job 31:12), a place of destruction, and the abyss in the sense of the abode of the dead (Job 26:6; Prov 15:11). Other references are found in Psalms (88:11) and Job (28:22). Abaddon is personified in the New Testament (Rev 9:11, presented in the Greek as Apollyōn) as an angel with authority over hell. Abaddon in this sense is the ruler and author of havoc and destruction on earth. (See also Asmodeus and Sheol.)

 

Oxford Dictionary of the Bible

 

Abaddon

 

In Hebrew = destruction, and in Job 26: 6 and Prov. 27: 20 denotes the abode of the dead, also called sheol or Hades. In Rev. 9: 11 it is personified to mean the destroyer of all life and peace.

 

 

Abyss

 

The depths of the sea. Because the Hebrews disliked the sea (cf. Rev. 21: 1), deep waters were regarded as the abode of demons. It was the appropriate destiny for the Gadarene swine when the demons had entered into them (Luke 8: 31, 33), and from the abyss antichrist will rise (Rev. 11: 7). In Rom. 10: 7 Paul refers to sheol, the abode of the dead, as ‘the Abyss’, which he seems to take from Ps. 71: 20 (‘earth's watery depths’, REB).

 

The New Unger's Bible Dictionary

 

ABAD´DON (a-badʹdon; Gk. Abaddon, “destruction”). The angel of the bottomless

pit (Rev. 9:11), and corresponding to Apollyon, “destroyer.” The word abaddon

means destruction (Job 31:12), or the place of destruction, i.e., Hades or the region of

the dead (Job 26:6; 28:22; Prov. 15:11).

 

Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary

 

ABADDON  Name meaning “to perish.” In the KJV Abaddon appears only in Rev. 9:11 as the Hebrew name of the angel of the bottomless pit whose Greek name was Apollyon. Abaddon occurs six times in the Hebrew Bible (Job 26:6; 28:22; 31:12; Prov. 15:11; 27:20; Ps. 88:11). The KJV and NIV translate Abaddon as “destruction,” while the NASB and RSV retain the word “Abaddon.” See Hell.

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1 hour ago, Patiently waiting for Truth said:

You were totally off topic, because the TOPIC was about the misuse of scriptures by the Watchtower... 

Where is your evidence I was off topic concerning The book of Revelations?

Also it is without question in regards to Revelation, you do not know who the star is.

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1 hour ago, NoisySrecko said:

What is the common theme by different interpretations?

 

Harper Collins

 

Abaddon (uh-bad′uhn; Heb., “destruction”).

1 In the Hebrew Bible, a place of destruction for the dead (Ps. 88:11; Job 26:6; 28:22; 31:12; Prov. 15:11). The term is typically regarded as a synonym for Sheol (cf. Prov. 27:20); if there is any distinction, it might be that people are sometimes said to be “brought up” or rescued from Sheol, but never from Abaddon. See also abyss; Sheol.

2 In the NT, the Hebrew name for the ruler of the Abyss, whose Greek name was Apollyon, “the Destroyer” (Rev. 9:11). See also abyss; Apollyon.

Apollyon (uh-pol′yuhn; Gk., “the destroyer”), a possible allusion to the Greek god Apollo or, perhaps, to the angel of death (Rev. 9:11). See also Abaddon.

 

Catholic Bible Dictionary

 

ABADDON (Hebrew, “destruction”) The name is used with several meanings. These include ruin and destruction in a broad sense (Job 31:12), a place of destruction, and the abyss in the sense of the abode of the dead (Job 26:6; Prov 15:11). Other references are found in Psalms (88:11) and Job (28:22). Abaddon is personified in the New Testament (Rev 9:11, presented in the Greek as Apollyōn) as an angel with authority over hell. Abaddon in this sense is the ruler and author of havoc and destruction on earth. (See also Asmodeus and Sheol.)

 

Oxford Dictionary of the Bible

 

Abaddon

 

In Hebrew = destruction, and in Job 26: 6 and Prov. 27: 20 denotes the abode of the dead, also called sheol or Hades. In Rev. 9: 11 it is personified to mean the destroyer of all life and peace.

 

 

Abyss

 

The depths of the sea. Because the Hebrews disliked the sea (cf. Rev. 21: 1), deep waters were regarded as the abode of demons. It was the appropriate destiny for the Gadarene swine when the demons had entered into them (Luke 8: 31, 33), and from the abyss antichrist will rise (Rev. 11: 7). In Rom. 10: 7 Paul refers to sheol, the abode of the dead, as ‘the Abyss’, which he seems to take from Ps. 71: 20 (‘earth's watery depths’, REB).

 

The New Unger's Bible Dictionary

 

ABAD´DON (a-badʹdon; Gk. Abaddon, “destruction”). The angel of the bottomless

pit (Rev. 9:11), and corresponding to Apollyon, “destroyer.” The word abaddon

means destruction (Job 31:12), or the place of destruction, i.e., Hades or the region of

the dead (Job 26:6; 28:22; Prov. 15:11).

 

Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary

 

ABADDON  Name meaning “to perish.” In the KJV Abaddon appears only in Rev. 9:11 as the Hebrew name of the angel of the bottomless pit whose Greek name was Apollyon. Abaddon occurs six times in the Hebrew Bible (Job 26:6; 28:22; 31:12; Prov. 15:11; 27:20; Ps. 88:11). The KJV and NIV translate Abaddon as “destruction,” while the NASB and RSV retain the word “Abaddon.” See Hell.

First time I have seen you speak your peace. The theme was address already. But of course, in regards to this, there is context and Hermeneutics.

Abaddon not only have relating Strong's, but also roots, but in regards to who he is in Revelations, is key.

Speaking of keys, most people do not realize who gave him the key and or where he got it prior to tossing Satan into an abyss for 1,000 years.

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3 hours ago, Space Merchant said:

peaking of keys, most people do not realize who gave him the key and or where he got it prior to tossing Satan into an abyss for 1,000 years.

*** it-1 p. 12 Abaddon ***
In the Hebrew scriptures just considered, it is evident that ʼavad·dohnʹ is paralleled with Sheol and death. At Revelation 1:18 we find Christ Jesus stating: “I am living forever and ever, and I have the keys of death and of Hades.” 
 

I was afraid. However, Christ holds the keys to the first and second resurrection. That is the theme in Revelation. When Jesus died as a man, he was granted immortality where he cannot be destroyed as an angel, while other angels can.

Here's an example coming from another Christian interpretation, which Jehovah's Witnesses refine. ETERNITY

Therefore, the first resurrection is for the people of God; the second resurrection is for the judgment of unbelievers. The difference between these two groups is based on one's relationship with God through Jesus Christ. It is essential for every person to hear the good news and be saved by grace through faith (Ephesians 2:8-9) to receive eternal life (John 3:16).

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22 hours ago, Space Merchant said:

Where is your evidence I was off topic concerning The book of Revelations?

Simply because the topic was not mainly about Revelation. The topic was about the Watchtower admitting that they got interpretation wrong, therefore they admitted misusing scripture.  In the Watchtower quote that I used about the locusts I cannot see any mention of the Angel of the Abyss. Um, maybe you should be a Watchtower writer, you see to know more than they do. 

SM, you have great knowledge of scripture and other things. This is your topic here, enjoy it.  

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9 hours ago, NoisySrecko said:
12 hours ago, Space Merchant said:

peaking of keys, most people do not realize who gave him the key and or where he got it prior to tossing Satan into an abyss for 1,000 years.

*** it-1 p. 12 Abaddon ***
In the Hebrew scriptures just considered, it is evident that ʼavad·dohnʹ is paralleled with Sheol and death. At Revelation 1:18 we find Christ Jesus stating: “I am living forever and ever, and I have the keys of death and of Hades.” 

The REAL question is .... who is going around making all these keys?

...and would they be SKELETON Keys?

 

 

Abaddon Apollyon.jpg

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4 hours ago, Patiently waiting for Truth said:

Simply because the topic was not mainly about Revelation. The topic was about the Watchtower admitting that they got interpretation wrong, therefore they admitted misusing scripture.  In the Watchtower quote that I used about the locusts I cannot see any mention of the Angel of the Abyss. Um, maybe you should be a Watchtower writer, you see to know more than they do. 

SM, you have great knowledge of scripture and other things. This is your topic here, enjoy it.  

You focused on the notation of locusts, in regards to what connects to them, therefore, no evidence of you in regards to the off topic remark.

You also noted that the WT does not know or had confused the notation of locusts, and the mention of the angel of the abyss does not deviate from the Locust information, or wormwood, or the star, granted this all connect with each other in Revelations, so, a second time, no evidence of going off topic, I even linked your thread of which you ran from.

That being said, as a preacher, no one is going to take that from you in the general public when these questions arise. Also unwise to call someone out, and flee right afterwards, that is MSC mentality.

 

Speaking about misinformation, another make or break question was addressed to you, granted you did say I was wrong. Concerning the locust and Abaddon, who is the star?

I know you won't answer that, even when it relates to the WT link you posted.

If you cannot answer that, it shows you are not too sure if the latter is misleading people, or use the bible alone to attest to claim. Let alone that comment from Witness because her view on this is drastically different, of which I will post soon.

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@Pudgy The image reminds me of the old man who preached the gospel during Halloween.

The key in question is in the reference from the verse.

The opposite view doesn't make sense, for why would Satan be given a key to his own prison? Let alone do nothing to the Locust army; for they do not attack God's people.

But if we go with the Bad View, the one most Christians had concerning locusts and Abaddon for a time, then I guess we can call it a skeleton key.

That is like giving El Chapo the keys to his cell, of course he won't lock himself in there, he will run off.

As a side note, some Unitarians, even Biblical Unitarians use to address the locust as a scourge, and we did compare them to God's enemies for a time, until we ourselves connected the dots. My take is - the description threw a lot of people off, with both Abaddon and the Locust. You can't really blame people back then.

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