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Eruption of Sakurajima volcano, the most powerful in...

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The Librarian -
James Thomas Rook Jr. -
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Whenever I see photos like these (or ones from Mt. St. Helens. WA) I also begin to question if our fossil fuel burning is such a bad thing for the Earth.

This volcano alone probably added more "gunk" to Earth's atmosphere than every car, bus and factory in the history of man. Nevermind the other volcanos over the past century.

@James Thomas Rook Jr. 

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I had already posted the following on the Archive "thumbnails by date" (what is the official name for that, anyway?):

" Yeah ... and here in the United States, they ban Primatene Mist Asthma Rescue Inhalers because THE MUST-ERIOUS "they" believe (Belief is a strange and convoluted animal...) is that after the medicine is delivered to the lungs, the propellant is dangerous for the atmosphere, AND IS CONTRIBUTING TO DESTROYING EARTH'S CLIMATE.

...take a LOOK at this picture of the Japanese Eruption, and here the Mt. Pinatubo Explosion!!

The U.S. Geological Survey said this about the Cataclysmic 1991 Eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippine Islands ... which before they stopped measuring, put more pollution and claimed "Greenhouse Gasses" (greenhouse gasses ... the only REAL one is water vapor...) than the human race has collectively done in its entire history ... COMBINED ... by a factor of 870. ( ... that's 870 times MORE than EVERYTHING mankind has ever produced, altogether, for those in Rio Linda ....).

" Impacts of the Eruptions

Fortunately, scientists from the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and
Seismology and the U.S. Geological Survey had forecast Pinatubo's 1991 climactic
eruption, resulting in the saving of at least 5,000 lives and at least $250
million in property. Commercial aircraft were warned about the hazard of the ash
cloud from the June 15 eruption, and most avoided it, but a number of jets
flying far to the west of the Philippines encountered ash and sustained about
$100 million in damage. Although much equipment was successfully protected,
structures on the two largest U.S. military bases in the Philippines--Clark Air
Base and Subic Bay Naval Station--were heavily damaged by ash from the volcano's
climactic eruption.

Nearly 20 million tons of sulfur dioxide were injected into the stratosphere
in Pinatubo's 1991 eruptions, and dispersal of this gas cloud around the world
caused global temperatures to drop temporarily (1991 through 1993) by about 1°F
(0.5°C). The eruptions have dramatically changed the face of central Luzon, home
to about 3 million people."

Note that putting 870 times, and MORE greenhouse gasses, and crud into the atmosphere LOWERED the Earth's temperature ... NOT raised it.

We are being duped by Snowflakes.


.

AshCloud.jpg

AshCloud 700  .jpg

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