Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Awake 73 March 22 p.12 "the spirit of competition between players can lead to unpleasant circumstances...in some homes tensions linger long past checkmate...Chess has been a game of war since it originated...the games connection to war is obvious....a play substitute for the art of war...there is a danger of stirring uo competition with one another even developing hostility with one another something the bible warns against....What effect does playing Chess have on one? Is it a wholesome effect? ....there are questions regarding it that each one who plays chess should consider."

tumblr_motnjpAK1x1s865f6o1_500.png

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On The Morals of Chess by Benjamin Franklin

 


The game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement. Several very valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are to be acquired or strengthened by it, so as to become habits, ready on all occasions.

1. Foresight, which looks a little into futurity, and considers the consequences that may attend an action; for it is continually occuring to the player, 'If I move this piece, what will be the advantages or disadvantages of my new situation? What use can my adversary make of it to annoy me? What other moves can I make to support it, and to defend myself from his attacks?

2. Circumspection, which surveys the whole chessboard, or scene of action; the relations of the several pieces and situations, the dangers they are respectively exposed to, the several possibilities of their aiding each other, the probabilities that the adversary may make this or that move, and attack this or the other piece, and what different means can be used to avoid his stroke, or turn its consequences against him.

3. Caution, not to make our moves too hastily. This habit is best acquired, by observing strictly the laws of the game; such as, If you touch a piece, you must move it somewhere; if you set it down, you must let it stand. And it is therefore best that these rules should be observed, as the game becomes thereby more the image of human life, and particularly of war . . .

And lastly, we learn by Chess the habit of not being discouraged by present appearances in the state of our affairs, the habit of hoping for a favourable change, and that of persevering in the search of resources. The game is so full of events, there is such a variety of turns in it, the fortune of it is so subject to sudden vicissitudes, and one so frequently, after long contemplation, discovers the means of extricating one's self from a supposed insurmountable difficulty, that one is encouraged to continue the contest to the last, in hopes of victory from our own skill, or at least of getting a stalemate from the negligence of our adversary . . .

If your adversary is long in playing, you ought not to hurry him, or express any uneasiness at his delay. You should not sing, nor whistle, nor look at your watch, not take up a book to read, nor make a tapping with your feet on the floor, or with your fingers on the table, nor do anything that may disturb his attention. For all these things displease; and they do not show your skill in playing, but your craftiness or your rudeness.

You ought not to endeavour to amuse and deceive your adversary, by pretending to have made bad moves, and saying that you have now lost the game, in order to make him secure and careless, and inattentive to your schemes: for this is fraud and deceit, not skill in the game.

You must not, when you have gained a victory, use any triumphing or insulting expression, nor show too much pleasure; but endeavour to console your adversary, and make him less dissatisfied with himself, by every kind of civil expression that may be used with truth, such as 'you understand the game better than I, but you are a little inattentive;' or, 'you play too fast;' or, 'you had the best of the game, but something happened to divert your thoughts, and that turned it in my favour.'

If you are a spectator while others play, observe the most perfect silence. For, if you give advice, you offend both parties, him against whom you give it, because it may cause the loss of his game, him in whose favour you give it, because, though it be good, and he follows it, he loses the pleasure he might have had, if you had permitted him to think until it had occurred to himself. Even after a move or moves, you must not, by replacing the pieces, show how they might have been placed better; for that displeases, and may occasion disputes and doubts about their true situation. All talking to the players lessens or diverts their attention, and is therefore unpleasing.

Lastly, if the game is not to be played rigorously, according to the rules above mentioned, then moderate your desire of victory over your adversary, and be pleased with one over yourself. Snatch not eagerly at every advantage offered by his unskilfulness or inattention; but point out to him kindly, that by such a move he places or leaves a piece in danger and unsupported; that by another he will put his king in a perilous situation, etc. By this generous civility (so opposite to the unfairness above forbidden) you may, indeed, happen to lose the game to your opponent; but you will win what is better, his esteem, his respect, and his affection, together with the silent approbation and goodwill of impartial spectators.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, The Librarian said:

there are questions regarding it that each one who plays chess should consider.

I remember this article well. I really welcomed it at the time. As a teenager, a close friend of mine was an avid and highly proficient chess player. He actually taught me the game, and continued to trounce me daily for a period of years. I actually did checkmate him once when his concentration was impaired, but that was never repeated. He put his success down to his superior intellect, and constantly reminded me of this, attributing my "deficiency" to genetic inheritence.

We both became witnesses, and he continued his passion. Indeed, other witnesses (including some at Bethel) who shared this passion would travel miles to play him and of course their sole purpose in that was to attempt to beat him at the game. I don't recall any succeeding in this. Then, this article came out in the Awake. I was triumphant! My suspicions of the games "evil" origins were confirmed. My feelings of inferiority faded and my damaged self image was healed. My friend was unimpressed. "It's a matter of conscience" he said. "Doesn't change the fact you're just a born loser at this". By that time I had acquired some musical skills that my friend was desiring to emulate. He, unfortunately suffering from a condition where he couldn't hear note difference, was unable play in tune although he was able to technically read music much better than me. Somehow, the balance was adjusted by this as we came to agree that chess proficiency was not the only measure of intellect or worth as a person. We are still friends, and he still plays chess.

The article in the Awake summed up (more completely than the quote above), "Surely chess is a fascinating game. But there are questions regarding it that are good for each one who plays chess to consider." 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that article also. Was on the chess team in school. Many thought I should have stopped, but I did not. It was adversarial and I loved, still do after some 50 years. Competition in games are good, in balance and we must be able to draw the line; know when and where not to go to far with it, and it's hard being imperfect. I didn't huge up football, either, knowing it's origins. I thought I read once that it was the ending of a matter than the beginning, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, The Librarian said:

If you are a spectator while others play, observe the most perfect silence. 

When I was a boy, this was always the case. But now whenever a grandmaster moves there is always some jerk who hollers ‘IN THE HOLE!!”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Gone Away said:

The article in the Awake summed up (more completely than the quote above), "Surely chess is a fascinating game. But there are questions regarding it that are good for each one who plays chess to consider."

When I was in my 20's, I considered the Watchtower's "Questions", phrased in such a way as to make being COMPLETELY idiotic and clueless, and the opinions of writers living in an artificial fantasy bubble of their own construction,, plausibly deniable as the rantings of agenda driven shut-ins.

They were also against riding a motorcycle, skydiving, surfing, SCUBA diving and anything that stretched a person's mind and imagination.

To me... about such things they had absolutely NO credibility whatsoever.

Now, I am an old man, and look back with great fondness at my youth for having done such things .. and my "bucket list"is a lot shallower, and has many less items in it.

King David was most of his early life a bloodied combat soldier ... and was in the end described as "Old and satisfied with his days".

I can just see his response if some "Pharisee" told him it was a bad idea to play a game of chess.

Jesus stated that the poor would ALWAYS be with us.

He never addressed that the determined STUPID would always be with us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/27/2018 at 1:57 AM, The Librarian said:

...there is a danger of stirring up competition with one another even developing hostility with one another something the bible warns against.

In what world?

I have yet to see a chess game where the contestants (players) were anything but completely civil with each other, true gentlemen, and friendly ... and I have played perhaps 400 games myself with people all over the world, with great congeniality and friendliness.

Now, if you are playing "Battle Chess", where one of the contestants has severe acne, and an eye patch covering up a sword slash scar,  and the other has a tattoo that says "Born to Kill", and before the game begins both players put their guns and knives  on the table, and the timer is a nearsighted accountant chained to a chair, and they are wagering over several bars of gold,  and the virginity of a woman tied to railroad tracks,  and there is a gallows in the parking lot ... I might want to avoid that competition.

... or play to win!

 

Rook    600   .jpg.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

He never addressed that the determined STUPID would always be with us.

Jesus was only 3 1/2 years on Earth in a role of Teacher and Master. He had not enough time for "stupid" subjects .....

.... for example;

( would his  true disciple reject false, pagan customs, as playing chess, toasting,  exchange gifts and feast, Pinata... etc)

(or what sort of intimacy  are allowed and what are forbidden  between male and female couple ......)   :))).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@The Librarian you mentioned computer games i believe or PS4 and such like. Many of such games are for one person only, one player, and sometimes people shut themselves off in a room all alone to play these games. Mo son who is now 24 does this. It may be a 'wind down' after work for him but he does spend many hours through the night playing such games. 

As for Chess I used to love it at school, but it seemed to fade out of my life as i became more active as a teenager.  Mods didn't play chess, they danced, rode scooters and spent their money on clothes and records. 

Agree with @Srecko Sostar that Jesus wasn't concerned about such trivial things. 

But there are many things one could disagree with if one was as piccy as the GB. For instance Bridesmaids at weddings. Yes JW's have Bridesmaids even if they call them by a different name. But of course Bridesmaids are based on superstition and traditions of men. 

There was once I was at a Witness gathering / party and the youngsters were playing music. I had to say no no to one song which they started to play, but no one else seemed to object to it. The song 'I'm just a teenage dirtbag baby'. It's horrible.

Yet many years ago when I lived in Bristol a popular Elder of the Avonmouth Congregation would go around whistling 'Bohemian Rhapsody'. When i objected to it and told him why, he didn't care and continued to whistle it.  The song by Queen was sung by a homosexual and was about murder.  'Put a gun against his head, pulled the trigger now he's dead', Yes, lovely.

So you see we could object to so much in life. GB stop trying to turn people into puppets. You already have your Elder puppets,

'Hey GB leave the Congregants alone'  (sorry it's a take off of Another Brick in the Wall ) 'Hey teacher leave those kids alone' 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By admin
      After ten consecutive draws, a record for the 132-year-old championship, Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana are tied 5 points each in the best-of-12-games match. 
       
    • By Bible Speaks
      Like Games? ~ ???? ~ This Bible Games Will Help You Remember! 
      “For our Family Worship evening, we devised a really fun memory game to help us remember the correct order of Bible names. 
      Using two boxes of wooden blocks from a dollar store, we wrote all the Bible names on them. 
      Then on the extra pieces we wrote special positive names or words (i.e. Jehovah, paradise, love, faith etc) as bonus pieces. 
      All the pieces are  Was placed mixed upside down on the table. Each player begins by choosing five pieces each. 
      Then take turns choosing a piece to try matching Bible books in a consecutive order, using the bonus pieces to fill the gaps. 
      If a piece is chosen that doesn’t match up (i.e. Genesis and Psalms) the block is shown to the other players, then placed back face down in the same place it came from. thank you 
      Pieces can also be traded with another player as long as it’s mutually beneficial. 
      We had so much fun playing this game that we lost track of time!”

    • By Bible Speaks
      Who are they? Test your Knowledge? - Please interact? - Don't hide! - It will encourage you all. ?????

    • By The Librarian
      It's very simple. You just type in the first word that pops in your mind when you read the most recent word posted. Then the next person does the same, and etc, etc. You are allowed to explain your word choice if you wish.
      The rules are:
      1. One word only!
      2. Word must be a real word.
      First word:
      Ham
    • Guest Nicole




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.