Jump to content
The World News Media

The pandemic threatens imprisoned dissidents and journalists everywhere. They must be freed.


Isabella
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Member

PRISONS ARE fecund incubators for coronavirus — people in tight proximity, surfaces easily contaminated, closed internal spaces, poor hygiene and lack of medicines. For those around the world who have been thrown into jails for their beliefs, the pandemic could become a death sentence. Prisoners everywhere must be protected from the virus on humanitarian grounds, and political prisoners ought to be freed now so they do not die for their words and convictions.

In Kyrgyzstan, journalist Azimjon Askarov is ill. Let him go. Iran must release Iranian American businessman Siamak Namazi, held for more than four years in Evin prison. In Russia, the political prisoners include 26 Jehovah’s Witnesses in pretrial detention and eight in penal colonies. They should not face a covid-19 death sentence for their religious beliefs. In Venezuela, the “Citgo 6” have been recently moved from house arrest to prison. They are six oil company executives — five U.S. citizens and one permanent resident — arrested and detained in 2017. They must be released.

    Hello guest!

Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • Views 490
  • Replies 7
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

In the US there is a call for mandatory lockdown. Those who resist that call say What is the point?’ What, are you going to put people that disobey in jail, and thereby make the problems worse? That has happened in NYC. There is not much that can be done unless people voluntarily cooperate.  Horrible thing for those in prison. Yes, they should be released. Will they be? At least JWs have the knowledge that this life is not the ‘real life’ of 1 Timothy 6. None of us wants to die—death is inc

  • Member

In the US there is a call for mandatory lockdown. Those who resist that call say What is the point?’ What, are you going to put people that disobey in jail, and thereby make the problems worse? That has happened in NYC. There is not much that can be done unless people voluntarily cooperate. 

Horrible thing for those in prison. Yes, they should be released. Will they be? At least JWs have the knowledge that this life is not the ‘real life’ of 1 Timothy 6. None of us wants to die—death is inconvenient and it makes people feel bad—though death itself is not a cause of fear for those who trust in Bible promises.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member
7 hours ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

TTH:

I notice with your snarky comment, that you did NOT refute my premise.

I can’t quite get my head around what your ridiculous premise is.

Saying something is ‘political’ and so is not saying something! What sort of a ‘premise’ is that? Even here where bytes are cheap that premise is a waste of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Member
51 minutes ago, James Thomas Rook Jr. said:

There are good detectives,

and there are bad detectives,

Bad detectives do not actually detect much.

That’s a dumber comment than your preceding one! What does it apply to?

I will allow that I probably overreacted to your initial comment about what is political and what is not. You did not wave the red flag that you usually do—stupid comments about box cars of letters to serve as fuel for the Russians through cold winter nights. I was anticipating yet one more encore of that idiocy and you did not deliver it. My bad.

The Russian brothers always thought it a long shot for harassment to be alleviated by the campaign.  It would be icing on the cake if it had turned out that way. Instead, as it turned out, the consolation prize was every bit as valuable, perhaps even more so, and everyone in the world can see it but you!

It was for the witness! Obviously those government leaders did not read all the letters—they may have not read even one. But they could not have failed to know that they existed. They could not have failed to know that there is one ‘nation’ absolutely unique in the world of nations in which each and every member cares deeply about each and every other. Not only did they learn of it—most of the relevant power players in the world came to know of it—and there is always a chance, however remote, that one night Putin will be unable to sleep, as was Ahasuerus long ago, and he will say, ‘Bring me a packet of those letters from the the Jehovahs—what is it with those people that each and every one would do that way? Last time I went to church, the arch-deacon nearly ran over my feet in the parking lot on his way out.’

It also bound the brotherhood together—hugely important for those who value it. Witnesses the world over felt helpless. They longed for something that they could do, and here was something they could do! They could fortify their Russian brothers, now in the eye of the storm, but not left to weather it thinking that everyone has abandoned them. No, they realize that the hearts of the entire brotherhood are one with them! Who knows how many have been fortified to keep integrity on just that account?—and here you cannot let an opportunity pass to ridicule it!

We are social creatures. It is how Jehovah made us. We are not creatures as Witness and 4Jah would have everyone believe—and in this matter you throw in your lot with them—that say ‘Just Jesus n me!’—that’s enough! When God hands you an additional gift of a worldwide brotherhood, so essential for social beings, you do not reject to it to say, “Nope! No need, thanks. Me n Jesus—that will get me through!”

Nobody knows how things will play out, but one possibility is that it will play out as in that cassette drama of Brother Friend playing Moses. (If any casting ever illustrated the Peter Principle, that was it) One woman in the background—Zenia, I think her name was—was eternally whining and bitching and bellyaching and fault-finding and carrying on—and when she went down at the end into the opened earth,  the surviving Israelites did not say what they might be expected to say: ‘Ding dong, the witch is dead—what a pain in the rear end she was!’ No! They lamented her death because they were chumps—all of God’s people are. And should you ever go down for exactly the parallel reason, I too will not say, ‘Ding dong the witch is dead—what a pain in the rear he was!’ as reasonable people might expect me to say. i, too, will lament. for I, too, am a chump.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By xero
      Some people can't do the math. It's really quite simple - if you've been vaccinated, go about your life as normal. No need for a mask. I think it's a rather simple IQ test.   If you're still wearing one after you're vaccinated because "How do I know if the other people are really vaccinated?", the answer is simple "It's none of your business". If you aren't vaccinated for various reasons, that's your problem - take whatever precautions you feel necessary. But if you are vaccinated, stop being weird and sticking your nose into other people's business.   You might as well go full-on-neurotic-germaphobe then and never go out in public again because "Who knows whether these people washed their hands" or "I don't really know what's going on in that kitchen" or "Me ride a bus? Has this bus been subjected to gamma radiation to kill all the bugs?"
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      Last April, a ruling by Russia’s Supreme Court banned all Jehovah’s Witnesses organizations throughout the country, arguing the religious group to be extremist.
      On Friday, Murmansk regional authorities’ newspaper Murmanski Vestnik reports about raids made by FSB and the National Guard of Russia (Rosgvardia) in Polyarny on the Kola Peninsula.
      Two local residents were detained under suspicions of being members of the administrative centre of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia, organizing teaching and meetings where reading of banned religious literature took place. Searches were carried out at six addresses in Polyarny.    
      The town is home to a naval yard and several of the diesel-powered submarines and other warships of the Northern Fleet have Polyarny as homeport.
      The extremist law banning Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia provides for a maximum sentences of 6 to 10 years in jail.
      Meanwhile, a wave of practicing Jehovah’s Witnesses are fleeing Russia. More than a thousand people are now seeking asylum in several European countries, including Finland, the newspaper Helsingin Sanomat reported earlier this winter.
      «It all started last summer, and that’s when the first Witnesses sought asylum in Finland, spokesperson Veikko Leininen with the organization’s Finnish branch told the newspaper.
      «Many dozens at least are still to come,» he said.
      Press adviser Therese Bergwitz-Larsen with the Norwegian Directorate of Immigration (UDI) can’t go into details about particular reasons for asylum seekers coming to Norway.
      «Unfortunately, we can’t say anything in general on the background for reasons to apply for asylum, since the number [from Russia] is so small.»
      Statistics from UDI show that 15 persons came from Russia the first three months this year. In 2017, 58 Russian asylum seekers came to Norway.
      In Russia, the number of Jehovah’s Witnesses are estimated to about 175,000. That be, before the organization was declared extremist. Viewed with skepticism for denying military service, voting and refusal to take blood, the members are seen as both a threat to themselves, their children and public safety.
      Also during Soviet times, the Witnesses were persecuted.   
      Human Right Watch recently called on Russian authorities to drop charges against Danish citizen Dennis Christensen adherent for practicing his faith. Christensen has been in pretrial custody for 11 months in the town of Orel. Human Right Watch argues that Russia is a member of Council of Europe and  a party to the European Convention on Human Rights, and therefor is obligated to protect the rights to freedom of religion and association.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • Guest Nicole
      By Guest Nicole
      More than 200 Jehovah's Witnesses - a religious organization banned in Russia - have applied for asylum in Finland. More than 100 members of this organization have arrived in the European country only so far in 2018. According to Juha Simila, representative of the Finnish migration service, about 10 cases have been analyzed so far and, in most of them, Finland rejected the asylum application. Simila explained to the Finnish newspaper Aamulehti that some denials have been appealed to the court and that in one of the cases the negative decision of the migration service has already been confirmed.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      Two years ago, Russian activist Vladimir Kara-Murza pointed out that Vladimir Putin’s Russia had more political prisoners than the USSR did when Andrey Sakharov began calling attention to them in the USSR in 1976 (rferl.org/a/activist-number-of-political-prisoners-in-russia-twice-what-it-was-in-ussr/30048022.html).
      In period since Kara-Murza made that calculation, Ellen Leafstedt of St. Antony’s College in Oxford says, the numbers of political prisoners in Russia have only increased and indeed continue to rise. In an article for the Riddle portal, she suggests that it is important to recognize their diversity (ridl.io/ru/nakazanie-bez-prestuplenija/).
      One can divide them into two categories, “people who land in prison for public expression of their political convictions and those who represent minorities who are deprived of their freedom for religious affiliations and convictions. The latter category is the more numerous, Leafstedt says.
      Among the most numerous of the second category are those charged with terrorism for their affiliation with groups like Hizb ut-Tahrir. Rapidly growing in number are Jehovah’s Witnesses whose denomination the Russian Supreme Court declared to be an extremist organization.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Just another man
      Turbulent Gas Clouds and Respiratory Pathogen Emissions: Potential Implications for Reducing Transmission of COVID-19 (MIT Analysis)
      https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2763852
      Welp, that 7-8m photo is definitely nightmare fuel, and the video just made it worse. The cloud just hangs in the air at around 20ft.

       
    • By Isabella
      Russian authorities opened a criminal case this week against five Jehovah’s Witnesses on suspicion of “organizing and participating in the activities of an extremist organization” for allegedly promoting their namesake religious group, which is officially outlawed as an “extremist ideology” in Russia.
      Russia’s Investigative Committee, its main federal investigating body, announced the criminal case in a statement issued March 4.
      Five residents of the city of Syktyvkar, in Russia’s northwestern Komi Republic, allegedly “carried out active organizational actions aimed at continuation of the organization’s illegal activities and the involvement of new participants in it” over a four-year period between 2017 and 2021.
      “In particular, acting in secrecy, they carried out general management of the organization’s activities, coordinated illegal activities, organized and held meetings of members of a banned organization, and collected funds to finance the activities of a banned extremist organization,” according to the statement.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      RNS) — A female Jehovah’s Witness has been sentenced to two years in a Russian prison for practicing her faith, marking the first time the country has imprisoned a woman since a 2017 ruling that declared the faith group “extremist.” Valentina Baranovskaya, 69, was sentenced Wednesday (Feb. 24) along with her son, Roman Baranovskiy, 46, who received a six-year sentence.
      “Today, Judge Elena Shcherbakova ruthlessly imprisoned a harmless, elderly woman and her son on baseless charges,” said Jarrod Lopes, spokesman for the Jehovah’s Witnesses. “The ruling was a mockery of the rule of law — both international human rights law as well as Russia’s constitution, which protects religious freedom.”
      In October, a Jehovah’s Witness named Yuriy Zalipayev was acquitted and shortly afterward six other members of the faith were given suspended sentences by a different judge.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Anna
      In view of last weeks WT study "Do you have the facts" (August 2018, page 3) and thanks to @Gone Away for highlighting the following reports, I thought I would put this in a separate and concise topic to show an actual and recent example of misinformation.
      NEWS REPORT: (I cut it a little short because the article went on about the ban in general. You van read the whole thing here:
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content. MOSCOW: Five Jehovah's Witnesses have been detained in Russia and charged with possessing weapons and running an extremist group, investigators said Wednesday (Oct 10, 2018), in the latest case targeting the banned religious movement.
      They were arrested in the Kirov region northeast of Moscow, where authorities said they found two grenades and a landmine in searches of their homes.
      The Jehovah's Witnesses are a Christian denomination that originated in the United States in the late 19th century.
      The Russian authorities consider the movement a totalitarian sect and last year the country's supreme court banned the Jehovah's Witnesses from operating in Russia.
      "They had been conducting meetings and called on others to join their organisation," Yevgenia Vorozhtsova, a spokeswoman for regional investigators, said.
      She said officials were investigating how the members of the Jehovah's Witnesses had obtained the ammunition, but declined to provide further details.
      Yaroslav Sivulskiy, a member of the European Association of Jehovah's Christian Witnesses, said it was the first time the Russian authorities had accused members of the movement of possessing ammunition.
      "We were shocked," he said from the Latvian capital Riga. "It is both funny and strange. Why mines?"
      One of those detained was a Polish national residing in Russia, he said.
       
      THE FACTS: (here I took the liberty of slightly adjusting the translation by Google, so it made more sense)
      On October 9, 2018, in the city of Kirov, during a search of the house of retired Vladimir Bogomolov, a collector of artifacts from the Great Patriotic War (1941-1945), investigators seized fragments of obviously unusable rusty shells. The man was searched because his 69-year-old spouse (the only one of her entire family) professes the religion of Jehovah's Witnesses. The woman does not share her husband's fascination with antiques. Thus, the report that the ammunition was seized allegedly from Jehovah's Witnesses is not true.
      Jehovah's Witnesses do not take weapons for conscience reasons. For this position they appeared before tribunals of different countries and went to concentration camps. They will be grateful to the media for clarifying the misunderstanding .
      Vladimir Bogomolov, from whom the relics were confiscated, was in the past an active participant in a search movement (aimed at burying the remains of the soldiers who died in World War II), he was the brigadier of the search party. The activities of his squad were written about in newspapers. On October 9, 2018, upon the discovery of the artifacts, a criminal case on the illegal possession of weapons was instituted, it was allocated in a separate proceeding. The items were sent for examination.
       Source: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.  
       
    • By Isabella
      Russian authorities have detained and placed under house arrest a Jehovah’s Witness in Siberia amid a continued crackdown on the religious group, which was labeled as extremist and banned in the country in 2017.
      The Investigative Committee said in a statement on February 17 that a 53-year-old resident of the town of Belovo in the Kemerovo region was placed under house arrest on suspicion of organizing a Jehovah’s Witnesses "cell."
      The man, whose identity was not disclosed, refused to cooperate with investigators citing Article 51 of the Russian Constitution, the statement said, adding that the suspect had been apprehended after the homes of several alleged members of the banned group were searched in the region.
      Article 51 states that no one shall be obliged to give incriminating evidence.
      The announcement came a week after a court in Russia's Krasnodar region sentenced a 63-year-old Jehovah's Witness, Aleksandr Ivshin, to 7 1/2 years in prison, the harshest sentence since authorities launched the campaign against the religious group.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      Six Jehovah's Witnesses jailed on "extremism"-related charges applied for early release after serving half their jail terms, but have been unsuccessful. Prison administrations opposed the applications with what Jehovah's Witnesses describe as "fabricated evidence" of violations of prison rules. Four of the prisoners were accused of smoking in the wrong place, but Jehovah's Witnesses do not smoke. Another Jehovah's Witness jailed since 2018 and a Muslim reader of Nursi's works jailed since 2017 should both become eligible to apply in summer 2021.
      Six Jehovah's Witnesses jailed on "extremism"-related charges for exercising their right to freedom of religion or belief have so far failed in their applications for early release. On the fourth attempt, a court commuted the rest of Dennis Christensen's jail term to a fine, but this was overturned after prosecutors appealed and he remains in jail. Four jailed Jehovah's Witnesses from Saratov have similarly failed in their appeals for early release, while a fifth is still awaiting a hearing. Read more: Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      ussian security services raided the homes of several Jehovah's Witnesses in Moscow on Wednesday, in an ongoing crackdown on the US-based religious movement.
      Moscow outlawed the Jehovah's Witnesses in 2017, labelling it an extremist organization and has since sentenced several members to lengthy jail terms.
      The Investigative Committee, which probes major crimes, said on Wednesday several "organizers and members" had been detained.
      Prosecutors, the FSB security services and the national guard carried out searches at 16 addresses, the committee said.
      Investigators said the Jehovah's Witnesses had established a branch in the capital where "secret meetings" were convened to study "religious literature".
      Jarrod Lopes, a New York-based spokesman for Jehovah's Witnesses, said the raids "are further proof that Russia is reverting to its muscle memory of Soviet repression".
      He added that they were a new escalation in the crackdown, as most of the raids on the believers had previously taken place in regions outside the Russian capital.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      A court in southern Russia has handed the country's longest prison sentence yet to an elderly Jehovah’s Witness leader for organizing an “extremist” group, the religious organization said Wednesday.
      Authorities accused Alexander Ivshin, 63, of organizing the activities of a banned organization, including hosting Bible discussions with friends via video link, until his April 2020 detention as part of mass raids in the Krasnodar region. Russia outlawed the Jehovah’s Witnesses as “extremists” in 2017.
       
      Alexander Ivshin, 63, was sentenced to 7.5 years in prison for activities including hosting Bible discussions via video link.
       

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian law enforcement detained a number of Jehovah's Witnesses and conducted searches at 16 different addresses in Moscow on Wednesday as part of a new criminal investigation against the group, state investigators said.
      The Investigative Committee, which handles probes into major crimes, said the people had been detained for organising and taking part in the activities of a banned religious group.
      It said they had met in a flat in northern Moscow and studied the teachings of the religion despite being aware of the ban on the group's activities.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      The rapid spread of a new variant of coronavirus has been blamed for the introduction of strict tier four mixing rules for millions of people, harsher restrictions on mixing at Christmas in England, Scotland and Wales, and other countries placing the UK on a travel ban.
      So how has it gone from being non-existent to the most common form of the virus in parts of England in a matter of months?
      The government's advisers on new infections have "moderate" confidence that it is more able to transmit than other variants.
      All the work is at an early stage, contains huge uncertainties and a long list of unanswered questions.
      As I've written before, viruses mutate all the time and it's vital to keep a laser focus on whether the virus' behaviour is changing.
      Why is this variant causing concern?
      Three things are coming together that mean it is attracting attention:
      It is rapidly replacing other versions of the virus It has mutations that affect part of the virus likely to be important Some of those mutations have already been shown in the lab to increase the ability of the virus to infect cells All of these come together to build a case for a virus that can spread more easily.
      However, we do not have absolute certainty. New strains can become more common simply by being in the right place at the right time - such as London, which had only tier two restrictions until recently.
      But already the justification for tier four restrictions is in part to reduce the spread of the variant.
      "Laboratory experiments are required, but do you want to wait weeks or months [to see the results and take action to limit the spread]? Probably not in these circumstances," Prof Nick Loman, from the Covid-19 Genomics UK Consortium, told me.
      Read more: https://www.bbc.com/news/health-55388846
    • By Isabella
      Doña Gabina murió mientras se dirigía al Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, en busca de una cama de hospital tras personar síntomas graves de covid-19.

      Luego de esperar, sin éxito, una cama con ventilador en la Unidad de Infectología del Hospital Centro Médico Nacional La Raza, del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), doña Gabina falleció por covid-19 en el trayecto mientras se dirigía al Autódromo Hermano Rodríguez. “Ayer mismo cuando regresamos ya no aguanto mi mamá, se sentía muy mal y falleció en el camino. En el camino falleció”, comentó Laura, hija de doña Gabina, quien procreó y educó a 8 hijos. El cuerpo de doña Gabina se encuentra resguardado en una funeraria y será cremada en una horas. Laura recuerda que tuvo covid. “Acabo de salir, me dieron de alta hace tres días, estuve muy enferma. Mi hermano está encerrado (en casa) porque tiene covid junto con su familia. Nosotros nos infectamos varios”.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By admin
      https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-19741-6?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_content=organic&utm_campaign=NGMT_USG_JC01_GL_NRJournals
       
      ----------------------------------------------------
      And men are significantly more likely than women to be vitamin D deficient. Smoking gun?
      https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29705881/
      https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0096695
      https://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/hta/hta23020#/abstract
       
      If this is the smoking gun, it also explains why dark skinned minority populations is also getting sicker and dying more.
    • By Isabella
      f 21 Jehovah's Witnesses convicted of "extremism" charges since late July 2020, six were given jail terms and 13 suspended sentences. Receiving a suspended sentence means a convicted person must live under restrictions specified by the judge, regularly register with probation authorities, and avoid conviction for any other offence during the probationary period or risk being sent to prison. "A suspended sentence means that you need to live under stress for many years," Jehovah's Witnesses note.
      A total of 21 Jehovah's Witnesses have been convicted of "extremism" charges since late July 2020. They include the oldest Jehovah's Witness yet to be found guilty of alleged extremism offences (at the age of 73). Among the punishments imposed are both the largest fine and the longest suspended sentences since prosecutions began following the 2017 liquidation of the Jehovah's Witness Administrative Centre.
       
      Six of the 21 have received jail terms. The four defendants in one case in Bryansk Region will not be imprisoned as they had already served the time in pre-trial detention. Two men in another case in Kemerovo Region, however, will spend more than a year in jail if their appeal is unsuccessful.

      Thirteen of the 21 have received suspended sentences, most recently Sergey Ledenyov in Kamchatka on 24 November. The two others were given large fines (see below).

      Although not enough cases have ended to draw any definitive conclusions, it appears that, in 2020, courts have been moving towards suspended sentences for Jehovah's Witnesses, although prosecutors continue to request real prison terms in most cases. It remains unclear why this might be.

      Receiving a suspended sentence means that a convicted person is not imprisoned, but must live under a set of restrictions specified by the judge, regularly register with probation authorities, and avoid conviction for any other offence during the probationary period or risk being sent to prison (see below).

      The 21 individuals convicted since July are among more than 400 Jehovah's Witnesses and Muslim readers of theologian Said Nursi's works who have been convicted, are on trial, or remain under investigation across Russia, mostly on accusations of "organising" or "participating in the activities of a banned extremist organisation".

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      Moscow — Russian authorities have carried out dozens of raids and detained several people as they pursue a new criminal case accusing the country's Jehovah's Witnesses of extremism, the national Investigative Committee said Tuesday. The Christian denomination is suspected of illegally resuming its work in Russia despite an official ban.
      The country's Supreme Court ruled in 2017 that the group, founded in the United States and claiming almost 9 million followers globally, was an "extremist" organization and ordered it to disband. The decision led to the conviction of scores of followers across the country.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      UNITED NATIONS, November 18. /TASS/. The Third Committee of the UN General Assembly has Wednesday adopted the Ukraine-sponsored resolution condemning alleged human rights violations in Crimea, as the resolution was supported by 63 countries, 85 abstained and 22 opposed it. The document has been considered annually since 2016 and is not mandatory.
      The resolution in particular calls on Russia "to take all measures necessary to bring an immediate end to all violations and abuses against residents of Crimea." The document notes "discriminatory measures and practices, arbitrary detentions and arrests, torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, sexual and gender-based violence, including to compel apprehended persons to self-incriminate or ‘cooperate’ with law enforcement" among these abuses.
      Moscow is urged "to repeal laws imposed in Crimea by the Russian Federation that allow for forced evictions and the confiscation of private property, including land in Crimea, in violation of applicable international law."
      The resolution also calls on Russia "to respect the right to freedom of religion or belief and guarantee its enjoyment by all residents of Crimea, including but not limited to parishioners of the Orthodox Church of Ukraine, Muslim Crimean-Tatars and Jehovah’s Witnesses."
       
      Russia’s response
       
      Russia’s deputy permanent envoy Gennady Kuzmin said that "the resolution co-authors had been trying to punish Crimea’s population for their free choice in favor of Russia by shedding "crocodile tears" about Crimeans."
      Full article here: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      Prisoners of conscience Jehovah's Witnesses Sergei Filatov and Artyom Gerasimov are being denied letters sent to them. Muslim prisoner of conscience Renat Suleimanov is being denied letters sent in his own language of Crimean Tatar. He has been held for ten months in Kamenka Labour Camp's closed zone, in a cell holding 10 prisoners, but may be released in December. All were transferred illegally to jails in Russia.
      One of the three Crimean prisoners of conscience jailed in Russian labour camps for exercising freedom of religion and belief in Crimea is expected to complete his prison term at the end of December, more than three years after his October 2017 arrest. Muslim prisoner of conscience Renat Suleimanov has spent the ten months since January 2020 in the closed zone ("strict detention conditions") of Kamenka Labour Camp in Russia's Kabardino-Balkariya Republic.
       
      "If the labour camp has about 1,000 prisoners, the closed zone has about 10, and they are held all in one cell," relatives of Suleimanov told Forum 18. "It's like a prison within a prison." A labour camp official would not explain why Suleimanov is held in the closed zone (see below).

      Visits from relatives and friends is made difficult by the Russian authorities having moved Suleimanov so far from his home, against the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (known as the Mandela Rules – A/C.3/70/L.3) (see below).

      Letters from relatives have been handed on after being censored, but only if they are in Russian. Letters in the Crimean Tatar language are not given to Suleimanov, but he does have access to a copy of the Koran and can pray openly (see below).

      One of the two cases Suleimanov's lawyer lodged to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg is about the illegal transfer to a Russian prison (see below).

      Even once he completes his prison term, Suleimanov will have to live under restrictions for another year, while his bank accounts will remain blocked for many more years (see below).

      "It is difficult for Renat's mother, who is in her eighties," one of Suleimanov's relatives told Forum 18. "She survived the deportation of all the Crimean Tatars [in 1944] and then to have this at the end of her life." She last met her son in a meeting in the Investigator's office in the Crimean capital Simferopol in summer 2018 (see below).

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      More than 400 Jehovah’s Witnesses have been charged or convicted in Russia since the country banned the religious group as an “extremist” organization three years ago, the Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia has said.
      Since the April 2017 ban by Russia’s Supreme Court, law enforcement officers raided the homes of 1,166 worshippers’ families, the Jehovah’s Witnesses said
      Authorities have opened 175 criminal cases into “extremism” against worshippers as of late October 2020, with 148 of them still in progress, the Christian denomination said on its website. 
      More than half of the 400 worshippers spent between several days to three years in detention while awaiting trial. Some 310 have lost their jobs, businesses, pensions and bank accounts as a result of the “extremist” label.
      Four Jehovah’s Witnesses have died while under investigation.

      The Jehovah's Witnesses religious group has been banned in Russia as an "extremist" organization since April 2017

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      The St. Petersburg prosecutor's office filed a lawsuit demanding that the JW Library application of Jehovah's Witnesses be declared extremist on Google Play and the App Store. This was reported by the press service of city courts.
      The claim was accepted for production by the Oktyabrsky District Court.
      As indicated in the lawsuit, the JW Library publishes literature recognized as extremist in Russia. This application is copyrighted by the Pennsylvania Watchtower and Tract Society. The Russian court considered this organization to be the leading one in relation to Jehovah's Witnesses.
      Application developer - Jehovah's Witnesses ("Jehovah's Witnesses"). The lawsuit noted that the developer's website www.jw.org was banned in Russia and recognized as extremist.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By admin
      Xinhua
      Virus-hit Wuhan has two laboratories linked to Chinese bio-warfare program
      Virology institute there has China's only secure lab for studying deadly viruse
      ---------------------
      Here is more info from reddit user DodgeyEdgey:
      Here you go. In 2015 there was a test done at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. It was headed by Ralph Baric. https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/lab-made-coronavirus-triggers-debate-34502 The purpose of the lab test was to manipulate a bat coronavirus to see if it could infect humans. It was discovered that it could. https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.3985 
      One of the people who co wrote the paper was a Chinese researcher by the name of Xing-Ye Gi. Google scholar shows Gi has written or co-written numerous papers on SARS, ebola and coronavirus. https://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar?as_q=&num=10&btnG=Search+Scholar&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&as_occt=any&as_sauthors=%22Xing-Yi+Ge%22&as_publication=&as_ylo=&as_yhi=&as_allsubj=all&hl=en Gi works in Wuhan.
       
       
    • By LNN
      22 September 2020
      https://doi.org/10.1111/andr.12907
      "This review obtained clues from basic research on other viruses to understand how the novel SARS‐CoV‐2 virus might generate pathogenic effects in male fertility. We highlighted that male fertility might be highly vulnerable to SARS‐CoV‐2 infection. Infection with this novel virus not only seriously threatens an individual's overall health, but also might lead to male infertility."
       
    • By LNN
      https://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/coronavirus-global-daily-case-rate-passes-500000-for-first-time/WFKPQ76OJSA4KHKQ6GYB5BUPK4/
      "...According to modelling by the University of Washington, that death toll could double to more than 511,000 lives lost by February 28 next year.
      And as infection rates soar across Europe, the World Health Organisation has warned of an "exponential" rise in cases across the continent."
       
      We have seen the pandemic Summer. Now we get to see what happens in Winter
       
       
    • By LNN
      https://bnonews.com/index.php/2020/08/covid-19-reinfection-tracker/
    • By Isabella
      A Russian judge on Friday imposed an eight-year suspended prison sentence for a 24-year-old Jehovah’s Witness and a seven-year suspended sentence for his 27-year-old wife, capping a week that marked some relief amid continued persecution for the faith in Russia.
      An international spokesman for Jehovah’s Witnesses expressed gratitude that “this young couple will not need to be separated by prison bars” after the judge’s decision in Kostroma, 200 miles northeast of Moscow. The conviction comes a day after another judge in Ulyanovsk, on the Volga River, convicted six members of the persecuted faith. Those sentences were also suspended.
      “We are pleased that they were not imprisoned. Yet it remains a gross injustice for them to be convicted simply for their peaceful Christian worship,” said Jarrod Lopes, spokesman for Jehovah’s Witnesses, in a statement.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      (RNS) — A day after a Jehovah’s Witness became the first to be acquitted in Russia since a 2017 ruling declared his faith group “extremist,” six Russian members received suspended sentences for gathering for worship.
      The developments come a week after dozens of scholars from across the globe called on Russian President Vladimir Putin to end persecution of Jehovah’s Witnesses.
      The pacifist faith organization said six men and women were given suspended sentences ranging from 2 ½ to four years; in addition, they were given orders of “restricted freedom” from seven to 10 months in a court in the western city of Ulyanovsk. Freedom restrictions can include limitations on where they can travel and with whom they can associate.
      “We are pleased that they were not imprisoned, yet it remains a gross injustice for them to be convicted simply for their peaceful Christian worship,” said Jarrod Lopes, spokesman for the Jehovah’s Witnesses, in a Thursday (Oct. 😎 statement.

      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.
    • By Isabella
      When the knock came at the door at six in the morning, Sergei and Maria Silaev feared the worst.
      The couple first thought it was the Russian police, coming to arrest them for being Jehovah’s Witnesses.
      But it was the upstairs neighbour, telling them there was a water leak above their apartment.
      They were relieved, but after that had many anxious nights. "I couldn’t sleep," said Maria. From that moment on they knew they needed to leave Russia.
      The Silaevs life changed in 2017 when the Russian Supreme Court labelled their church an extremist organization and banned all Jehovah’s Witnesses organizations and gatherings in that country — a ruling that forced them, and other members, to go underground and meet in secret in their homes.
      Although no official reasons have been given for the persecution, it could be because members of the church are pacifist, refuse to serve in the military, don’t vote, and won’t salute the flag or take part in other nationalistic displays of loyalty.
      According to Human Rights Watch, Russian authorities have carried out at least 780 house raids since 2017 in more than 70 towns and cities across Russia.
      Altogether, more than 300 Jehovah’s Witnesses have been charged, are on trial, or have been convicted of criminal "extremism" for practising their faith. At least 32 are in prison, with sentences ranging from two to six years for leading or participating in church meetings. There are allegations of torture.
      "For Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia, practising their faith means risking their freedom," said Rachel Denber, deputy director of Human Rights Watch for Europe and Central.
      The Silaevs decided not to wait to see if they would be added to the list of the accused and arrested.
      In January they came to Canada as tourists, seeking refugee status after arriving. Soon after, they moved to Winnipeg to await a verdict on their claim. Speaking through a translator over Zoom, they shared their story with me.
      The Silaevs who have no children, lived in Tver, a city of about 400,000 people 200 kilometres north of Moscow. Sergei, 29, worked as a maintenance supervisor; Maria, 27, was a hairdresser and also helped her husband in his work.
      The effects of the persecution were felt gradually, they said, starting with a ban on the New World Translation, the version of the Bible used by Jehovah’s Witnesses. The couple got rid of their printed version, but kept a copy on their computer.
      This made Maria sad. "I enjoyed turning the pages and reading it," she said of her physical copy of the Bible.
      Then there was a ban on door-to-door and street witnessing — a hallmark of the church, in that country and around the world.
      Read more: 
      Hello guest! Please register or sign in (it's free) to view the hidden content.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Service Confirmation Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.